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2016 Hermosa Beach City Council

Candidate Debate Questions & Format



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The 2016 Hermosa Beach City Council Candidate Debate

Will take place on Wednesday, Feb 3, 2016

From 7 pm to 9 pm at the Hermosa Beach City Council Chambers

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7:00 pm - Introduction of Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates

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Start of the 2016 Hermosa Beach City Council Candidate Debate

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Opening Statements – 3 minutes for each Candidate’s Opening Statement

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The first block of Debate Questions 1 and 2 are based on documentation from the:

Hermosa Beach City Council Special Meeting of January 9, 2016

ISSUE PAPERS STUDY SESSION - STAFF RESOURCES & QUALITY OF WORK EXPECTATIONS

Issue Papers Study Session Agenda:

http://hermosabeach.legistar1.com/hermosabeach/meetings/2016/1/990_A_City_Council_16-01-09_Special_Meeting_Agenda.pdf

Issue Papers Study Session Video on Granicus:

Total Run Time: 8 Hours 40 Minutes

http://hermosabeach.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=6&clip_id=4032

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Debate Question 1 - Background:

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Special Meeting of the Hermosa Beach City Council on January 9, 2016.

Issue Papers Study Session

ISSUE PAPER: 1 (a) - STAFF RESOURCES & QUALITY OF WORK EXPECTATIONS

(City Manager Tom Bakaly)

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2542476&GUID=73F7F137-76C1-443A-9962-57A087BADB35

Strategic Plan and Action Agenda Tracking – October 2015

Background:

Hermosa Beach first started doing strategic planning and actively keeping track of projects starting in 2013.  Over the past three years Hermosa has typically identified 10 - 12 large projects a year while still managing the oil issue and a myriad of day-to-day activities and issues.  A list of the City’s progress on Council’s action items as of October 2015 when the Strategic Plan was adopted is attached.  The strategic plan for 2015 was delayed and not adopted until October.  We have tried to get an early start on updating the 2016 strategic plan, but it looks like all of Council will not be available until March, 2016 which means it will hopefully be adopted before the budget process in May, 2016. While oil is mostly behind us, the General Plan and private project Environmental Impact Reports (3) are not.  It will be very intensive if not impossible to finish the General Plan by the August grant deadline and make substantial progress on 10-12 action items. 

We have done a lot of things well, but expectations from Council and the community seem to be higher.  It used to be that when people wanted municipal services to be good, fast and cheap they had to choose 2 of those. Across the nation, people are now expecting municipal services and projects to be all three; good, fast and cheap.  We have tried to perform at a high level by finding new ways to provide services while still feeling the effects of a reduced work force, aging infrastructure and the recession.  This is called the “New Normal.” 

Including this issue paper, there are 12 issue papers about the major issues and projects that were identified in 2015 that will carry-over into 2016.  We have also done 4 issue papers on items that were asked to be put on the agenda by the prior City Council.  This does not include the 4 additional Other Matter items that were placed on the future agenda by the new City Council at its last meeting in 2015.  As Council reviews these issue papers in preparation for ranking 2016 priorities during strategic planning in March, Council should use the information to determine the number of goals for 2016 and what our definition of success will be.

Recently, City Council has asked for more information, analysis and engagement of citizens in decision making.  That is what good government is all about.   At our current staffing levels, this will cause things to take longer despite efficiency improvements 

In short, something has to give.  We have more projects and goals than we currently have the capacity to deliver at a top quality level.  If the pace continues, Council meetings will continue to be long and we all will suffer burn out and increased tension and ultimately additional cost. Fortunately we have developed many tools and resources to be as efficient as possible and measure our success, but in the end we need to prioritize more as a group and be clear on what service levels we are willing to accept as individuals. 

Policy Considerations:

1)  Does Council want to prioritize fewer goals, measure and guarantee success of those high priority issues? 

2)  Is Council willing to rely more on Boards and Commissions to help achieve priorities by delegating decisions to them? 

3)  Is Council willing to hire more staff and continue its practice of using consultants to perform staff work in order to accomplish more?

4)  Is Council willing to prioritize direct City issues separate from issues in other communities that have an impact on the City?

Next Steps:

1)  Review issue papers and prepare for prioritization in March, 2016.

2)  Make Mid-Year budget refinements in February and Preliminary budget submittal in June as determined by priority-based budgeting and performance measurement information.

3)  Develop long-term funding strategies that match long-term General Plan goals and short-term needs.

Attachments:

1. Strategic Plan and Action Agenda Tracking - October 2015

Respectfully Submitted by: Tom Bakaly, City Manager

Noted for Fiscal Impact: Viki Copeland, Finance Director

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2016 Debate Question 1:         

From the Hermosa Beach City Council Special Meeting - Issue Papers Study Session on January 9, 2016:

There are 12 Issue Papers about the major issues and projects that were identified in 2015 that will carry over into 2016.

Give us your list of the high priority issues from the 12 major issues and projects that absolutely must go forward in 2016. 

Why should these projects be addressed and completed?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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2016 Debate Question 2:         

From the Hermosa Beach City Council Special Meeting - Issue Papers Study Session on January 9, 2016:

There are 12 Issue Papers about the major issues and projects that were identified in 2015 that will carry over into 2016.

Give us your list of the low priority issues from the 12 major issues and projects that can be delayed to 2017 or later. 

Why should these projects be delayed, reduced or canceled?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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The second block of Debate Questions 3, 4 and 5 are based on documentation from the:

Hermosa Beach City Council Meeting – January 12, 2016

6 pm Study Session - Implementation of the Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy – Parking Strategy

Study Session Staff Report:

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2545862&GUID=D9309A1D-B47B-4EDD-8E30-EEF5F073ECCE

 

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DOWNTOWN CORE

REVITALIZATION STRATEGY - PARKING STRATEGY

(Community Development Director Ken Robertson)

Body

Recommended Action:

Recommendation

Confirm Council’s previous direction to continue to implement the Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy as a top priority, and provide input on the 11 proposed code amendments outlined in the Parking Strategy.

<http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=6059>.

Body

Background

The purpose of this study session is to provide an update on implementation of the Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy (“Strategy”), discuss the parking component of the Strategy, and confirm Council’s previous direction to continue to implement the Strategy. The Strategy identifies ways to increase the vitality of our Downtown Core, which is the area of the downtown district located between 10th and 14th Streets and between The Strand and Palm Drive. Throughout 2014, the City Council reviewed and made changes to the draft Strategy, and on February 24, 2015, the City Council accepted the Strategy and a set of Guiding Principles to help guide its implementation. The Council’s commitment to implement the Strategy is further strengthened by designation of the Strategy as one of the top six priorities of the City’s Strategic Plan.

The following principles accepted by the Council reflect the Strategy and are referred to as staff and the Planning Commission evaluate various zoning amendments:

Principles: 

1. Proactive strategy:  The Downtown Core, between 10th and 14th Streets and the Strand and Palm Drive focused on Hermosa Avenue and Pier Plaza is the heart of Hermosa Beach, and should be enhanced as the focus of social life in the city. It is part of the Downtown District, bounded by 15th Street, 8th Street, extending along Pier Avenue to Valley Drive.

2. Family-friendly, inviting to all:  Create an environment that appeals to the increasingly stable, diverse and family-oriented population and allows them to mutually co-exist, rather than being a place dominated by one group at the expense of another.

3. Daytime district:  Increasing the day-time population will add life and vitality that goes beyond the typical recreationally oriented uses that have been historically attracted to the beach setting of Hermosa Beach.

4. Pedestrian oriented:  Develop the Downtown Core as a pedestrian and people oriented place with an appropriate mix of uses and quality of development that contributes to a more sociable, publicly-spirited and economically viable place.

5. Eclectic beach character:  Improvement of parking facilities and management within the Downtown Core is essential to increasing economic vitality and maintaining the eclectic character of a district with small local businesses anchored by catalyst projects that provide synergy and support.  

6. Distinctive retail district:  Create a distinctive and well-defined retail district with quality shops and restaurants on the ground floor that are pedestrian oriented, family-friendly and appealing to a wide range of people.

7. Catalyst development:  High quality hotel development that respects the scale and unique character of Hermosa Beach and provides significant quality public spaces and benefits can enhance the hospitality, identity and economic viability of the Downtown District. 

8. Public investment:  Realizing the full potential of the Downtown Core requires investment in the public realm and public-private partnerships which signal the City’s commitment to the area and further city goals, attract economic enterprises, and reduce the negative social behavior that occurs within the Pier Plaza area.

Parking Strategy:

During Spring 2015 the Planning Commission commenced consideration of potential parking-related code amendments to implement to Strategy, taking into account the results of the January 2015 Beach Access and Parking Study commissioned by the City http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=5440 .  The most relevant parking information from the Strategy is provided below.

“The parking strategy is intended to encourage small, independent, local businesses in the downtown district maintain the smaller scale, and small town character and manage the parking demand fluctuations more effectively, particularly since there are surges during the summer and weekends. There are two primary aspects of the parking strategy - first, the development of a public parking supply that is publicly managed with demand pricing to help control the distribution and availability of parking. The public parking can be provided for by using in-lieu fees and parking charges to help pay for the program, and a specific financing plan for these will need to be developed. New public parking structures should be located to help alleviate peak loading on thoroughfares and for better traffic management. In addition to these, convenient, short term on-street parking, like what was developed on Pier Avenue, should be encouraged on Hermosa Avenue, the other major downtown retail street. The second component of the parking strategy involves modifications to the existing zoning requirements for new development in support of a pedestrian-oriented district where the continuity and quality of the pedestrian experience is given a priority and a certain amount of walking to parking facilities is part of the experience of place.”

Zoning Modifications: “Concerns were raised in initial discussions with developers, realtors and property owners about parking requirements in the existing Zoning Code and the deterrent that they impose upon economic vitality and the ability to maintain and further the small scale village environment of downtown Hermosa Beach. In particular, a significant concern is the effect that these requirements have on the ability to encourage office development on upper floors which would be beneficial in enhancing the daytime population and thus the market support for retail and restaurant functions.

Existing parking issues and requirements in Hermosa Beach were reviewed along with those of other selected beach cities. The conclusion of this effort is that there should be a greater emphasis on how parking solutions can help to create a more attractive and accessible pedestrian-oriented district, where a greater mix and intensity of activities are desired while still accommodating beach-going peak visitor demand.”

Refer to this web link for the complete Staff Report:

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2545862&GUID=D9309A1D-B47B-4EDD-8E30-EEF5F073ECCE

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Hermosa Beach City Council Meeting – January 12, 2016

Implementation of the Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy – Parking Strategy on the City’s Granicus Video System

6 pm Study Session - Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy - Granicus Video Link:

http://hermosabeach.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=6&clip_id=4034

Total Run Time of Downtown Core Revitalization Study Session – Parking Strategy: 1 Hour and 20 Minutes

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Note: Dragging the video slider for the Council meeting video on the Granicus video page is cumbersome, so I have included the Opening quotes of each speaker included so you can confirm that you are at the starting point of each speaker.

Note: This January 12, 2016 City Council study session video has the most up to date opinions from the current City Council Members regarding the Downtown Core Revitalization – Parking Strategy

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6 pm Study Session - Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy - Granicus Video Link:

http://hermosabeach.granicus.com/MediaPlayer.php?view_id=6&clip_id=4034

Mayor Petty – Calls the Special Meeting Study Session to Order – Note: Special Meeting Granicus Video Starts at 1 hour, 19 min, 40 sec

City Manager Tom Bakaly – Downtown Core Parking Strategy - Study Session Overview Granicus Video - at 1 hour, 20 min, 10 sec

Tom’s opening quote: “What we wanted to do tonight is give you an overview of some of the parking questions that have been addressed as part of the Downtown Core Strategies . . .”

Ken Robertson - Downtown Core Parking Strategy – Parking Strategy Elements Granicus Video – at 1 hour, 21 min, 00 sec

Ken’s opening quotes: “I was also hoping to give you an update on where we were on some of the other elements of the strategy. . .”

“So, there is really two parts to the parking strategy.  What we want focus on tonight is really the part that relates to the parking requirements for new development in the downtown or expansions to existing uses downtown . . .”

Tom Bakaly asks for the City Council Members comments on Downtown Core Revitalization Parking Strategy - Starts at 1 hour, 42 min, 30 sec

Tom’s opening quote: “ I think what would be helpful for us is to understand and begin a dialogue about what your priorities are related to parking . . .”

Followed by the City Council Members comments on the Downtown Core Revitalization Parking Strategy.

Ken Robertson - Downtown Core Parking Strategy – General Direction Strategy Question and Council Members comments – at 2 hours, 17 min, 50 sec

Ken’s opening quote: “ I guess just the general direction question, I mean am I hearing that you still want us to proceed along just as our work program allows us?  Or . . .”  Followed by the City Council Members comments on the general direction for the future implementation of the Downtown Core Parking Strategy.

Public Comments - Downtown Core Parking Strategy – at 2 hours, 22 min, 20 sec

End of Downtown Core Parking Strategy – Study Session - at 2 hours, 39 min, 00 sec

Total Run Time of Downtown Core Revitalization Study Session: 1 Hour and 20 Minutes

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Debate Question 3 - Background:

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DOWNTOWN CORE REVITALIZATION STRATEGY - PARKING STRATEGY

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2545862&GUID=D9309A1D-B47B-4EDD-8E30-EEF5F073ECCE

From the January 12, 2016 Study Session Staff Report:

“The purpose of this study session is to provide an update on implementation of the Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy (“Strategy”), discuss the parking component of the Strategy, and confirm Council’s previous direction to continue to implement the Strategy.”

“There are two primary aspects of the parking strategy - first, the development of a public parking supply that is publicly managed with demand pricing to help control the distribution and availability of parking.”

“New public parking structures should be located to help alleviate peak loading on thoroughfares and for better traffic management.”

“All parking in the pedestrian-oriented district should be allowed to be provided off-site,”

From the January 12, 2016 Study Session:

Presentation Slides for Downtown Revitalization Strategy zoning discussion.

Presentation Slides for Downtown Revitatlization Strategy zoning discussion

Zoning Discussion Presentation Slide 11 – More Parking Options

“Should parking requirements for commercial uses within the downtown district be allowed in common facilities within a quarter mile walking distance?”

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The Downtown Core Revitalization Parking Strategy includes proposals for building 3 large multi-level public parking structures, in order to service visitor car parking for the Hermosa Beach downtown area.

1.  The first multi-level parking structure for the public is proposed to be at the City’s Parking Lot A, which is a City owned surface parking lot directly south of Pier Plaza, on the corner of 11th Street and Hermosa Avenue, in the downtown area.

2.  The second multi-level public parking structure is to be part of a proposed newly constructed Civic Center, at the current location of City Hall, 1315 Valley Drive, outside the downtown area.

3.  The third multi-level public parking structure is proposed to be located on the City owned land, directly west of the Community Center building on the corner of PCH and Pier Avenue, outside the downtown area.

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2016 Debate Question 3:

What is your opinion regarding the financing and construction of 1 or more large multi-level public parking structures, in order to service visitor car parking for the Hermosa Beach downtown area?

How would the City finance the construction of a multi-million dollar parking structure?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Debate Question 4 - Background:

There are many existing single story commercial buildings that were built in the 1910’s, the 1920’s, into the 1950’s, in the Hermosa Beach Downtown area. 

Some people believe that these 60 to 100 year old single story commercial buildings provide a unique character and scale to the Hermosa Beach downtown.

The Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy is proposing numerous “special incentives and provisions to minimize the impact of parking” requirements, for the redevelopment of single-story commercial buildings and to provide incentives to open new restaurants with outdoor dining/seating.

Reductions in parking requirements are also proposed as incentives to build new multi-story mixed-use buildings.

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Refer to the Staff Report 15-0480: DOWNTOWN CORE STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2359538&GUID=4B9FE252-6BF0-4553-BEC8-5D10A6A471B2

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From Staff Report 15-0480:    DOWNTOWN CORE STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE

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Land Use and Zoning Recommendations:

1. Pier Avenue, from PCH to Hermosa Avenue and including the Community and Civic Center sites and Hermosa Avenue  and the Downtown Core from 10th to 14th Streets should be designated as a pedestrian-oriented district, with special incentives and provisions to minimize the impact of parking,

2. Required parking in the pedestrian-oriented district should be allowed, to provide off-site, rather than the current 25% of required on-site parking for buildings,

3. There should be a reduced amount of required parking for commercial (office and retail) uses within the pedestrian oriented district.

4. There should be a reduced amount of required parking for restaurant uses within the pedestrian-oriented district.

5. Outdoor seating should be encouraged for the creation of a more sociable environment within the pedestrian oriented district. Parking requirements for outdoor seating should be reduced appropriately to encourage the diversity of types of establishments within the downtown district and in particular within the Downtown Core.

6. Parking requirements should be reduced for mixed use buildings on a single lot that generate parking demand during different times of the day without the need for a discretionary action by the City. There are currently a variety of conditions upon which the amount of parking reduction may be allowed or a fee paid in lieu of providing parking, but a discretionary review is required.

7. Upper level office use should be encouraged to attract a lively downtown environment and provide a greater daytime population that supports retail and restaurant uses. Parking for upper level office and service uses should be reduced and located off-site in shared parking and public parking facilities.

8. Vehicular parking requirements should be reduced in exchange for the provision of additional bicycle parking,

9. For an existing non-restaurant use that is converting to restaurant use and whose parking requirements are met in common facilities within the pedestrian-oriented district, a credit against the future parking requirements should be allowed,

10. Parking requirements for commercial uses within the pedestrian-oriented district should be allowed in common facilities within a quarter mile walking distance.

11. Parking requirements for commercial uses within the pedestrian-oriented district should be based on a net usable building square footage basis that is, not including for example, bathrooms, hallways, lobbies, service, storage and mechanical rooms.

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The proposed reduction of parking requirements, zoning modifications, the construction of multi-level parking structures, the incentives that allow for off-site parking, and the incentives to add new restaurants with outdoor dining, all help to promote “the demolition of” or “the redevelopment of” existing single-story commercial buildings in Hermosa Beach.

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2016 Debate Question 4 –

Do you support the granting of any new parking incentives, zoning modifications or new land rights, to promote the demolition and redevelopment of 60 to 100 year old commercial buildings in the downtown area? 

How many of these older single-story buildings in the Hermosa Beach downtown, should be knocked down and replaced with modern multi-story commercial buildings?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Debate Question 5 - Background:

The proposed Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy plan proposes new outdoor dining/seating on public sidewalks and would allow for reduced parking requirements to be granted for converting an existing non-restaurant uses, in order to create new restaurant uses, such as adding new outdoor dining establishments on Upper Pier Avenue public sidewalks.

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IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DOWNTOWN CORE REVITALIZATION STRATEGY - PARKING STRATEGY

https://hermosabeach.legistar.com/LegislationDetail.aspx?ID=2545862&GUID=D9309A1D-B47B-4EDD-8E30-EEF5F073ECCE

From the January 12, 2016 Study Session Staff Report:

5. Outdoor seating should be encouraged for the creation of a more sociable environment within the pedestrian oriented district. The determination of the appropriate amount of outdoor seating within the public street right-of-way should be based on lot frontage length, maintaining adequate space for pedestrian circulation and considerations related to adjacencies and public safety. These are to be determined on a case-by-case basis at a staff level by the Community Development and Public Works Director. Parking requirements for outdoor seating should be reduced appropriately to encourage the diversity of types of establishments within the downtown district and in particular within the Downtown Core.

From the January 12, 2016 Study Session - Presentation Slides for Downtown Revitalization Strategy zoning discussion.

Presentation Slides for Downtown Revitatlization Strategy zoning discussion

Presentation Slide 6 – Outdoor Dining

“Should the prohibition on outdoor dining on Pier Avenue be eliminated and the 200 SF allowance without parking be incorporated?”  [Note: This prohibition on outdoor dining currently exists on the Upper Pier Avenue]

“Should the standards for Pier Plaza encroachments be amended to allow the 200 SF allowance without additional parking?”

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2016 Debate Question 5 –

The proposed Downtown Core Revitalization Strategy plan allows for outdoor dining/seating and would allow for reduced parking requirements to be granted for converting existing non-restaurant uses, in order to create new restaurant uses, such as adding new outdoor dining establishments on Upper Pier Avenue.

Any new or existing restaurant in Hermosa Beach that does not have alcohol service can get a ABC beer and wine license granted “by right”, with staff approval, and not be subject to the Condition Use Permit process, if the restaurant closes by 10 pm.

Do you support adding private business encroachments to Upper Pier Avenue public sidewalks, such as A-frame signs, retail product displays or seating for snack shops?

Do you support permanently fenced outdoor dining areas on Upper Pier Avenue public sidewalks for new or existing alcohol serving restaurants? 

[Note: The California Alcohol Beverage Control requires that outdoor dining areas for alcohol serving restaurants, must have permanent barriers that surround the outdoor dining area.]

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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2016 Debate Questions from the Audience –          

Each audience member that asks a question, must pose their question for all City Council Candidates to answer. 

Please do not direct your question to a specific City Council Candidate by name.

Each City Council Candidate will be answering that same audience question.

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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The next question is based on the following Hermosa Beach Police Department Monthly Reports;

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Hermosa Beach Police Department
Monthly Report

December – 2014

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=5422

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Hermosa Beach Police Department
Monthly Report Part 1 Crime Statistics

December – 2015

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=6861

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Debate Question 6 - Background:

FBI Uniform Crime Report (UCR) Program – UCR Offense Definitions:

http://www.ucrdatatool.gov/offenses.cfm

As defined by the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, the seven major Part I offenses are used to measure the extent, fluctuation, and distribution of serious crime.

Part I crimes are the seven most serious offenses in two categories (violent and property crime).

Serious violent crime is defined as murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault.

Serious property crime is defined as burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft.

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2015 PART 1 CRIME STATS FROM THE HBPD:

Hermosa Beach Part 1 Violent Crimes that have shown an increase in the 24 months of 2014 thru 2015:

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Total Part 1 Violent Crimes

28 - YTD December 2013
44 - YTD December 2015

57.1% Increase in Part 1 Violent Crimes in 24 Months, Jan. 1, 2014 thru Dec. 31, 2015

Part 1 Violent Crimes are defined as; murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault.

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For the 24 months of, 2014 thru 2015 Hermosa Beach had a

Part 1 Violent Crime rate that was 2 times that of Manhattan Beach.
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Part 1 Rape

[Part 1 Rape: Listed as “Sex Crimes” in HBPD Monthly Reports]

5 - YTD December 2013
7 - YTD December 2015

40% Increase in Rape in 24 Months, Jan. 1, 2014 thru Dec. 31, 2015

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For the 24 months of, 2014 thru 2015, Hermosa Beach had a

Part 1 Rape crime rate that was 2.5 times that of Manhattan Beach.

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Part 1 Robbery

6 - YTD December 2013
12 - YTD December 2015

100% Increase in Robbery in 24 Months, Jan. 1, 2014 thru Dec. 31, 2015

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For each year, 2011 and 2012,
the Hermosa Beach Police Department per capita Calls for Service
exceeded the Manhattan Beach PD Calls for Service by more than 2.5 times.

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Part 1 Aggravated Assault

17 - YTD December 2013
25 - YTD December 2015

47% Increase in Aggravated Assault in 24 Months, Jan. 1, 2014 thru Dec. 31, 2015

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For the 24 months of, 2014 thru 2015 Hermosa Beach had a

Part 1 Aggravated Assault crime rate that was 1.75 times that of Manhattan Beach.
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2015 PART 1 CRIME STATS FROM THE HBPD:

Hermosa Beach Part 1 Violent Crime that have shown an increase in 2015:

Part 1 Violent Crimes are defined as; murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault.

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Total Part 1 Violent Crimes

37 - YTD December 2014
44 - YTD December 2015

18.9% Increase in Part 1 Violent Crimes in 12 months, YTD 2015

Part 1 Violent Crimes are defined as; murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault.
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For each year from 2006 to 2012, Hermosa Beach

exceeded the Manhattan Beach Part 1 Crime rate

for; Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Burglary.

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Part 1 Robbery

11 thru YTD December 2014
12 thru YTD December 2015

9% Increase in Robbery in 12 months, YTD 2015

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For the period, 2008 thru 2011 Hermosa Beach had a per capita

Part 1 Robbery crime rate that was more than 50 percent higher than Manhattan Beach.
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Part 1 Aggravated Assault

19 thru YTD December 2014
25 thru YTD December 2015

31% Increase in Aggravated Assault in 12 months, YTD 2015
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For the period, 2006 thru 2009 Hermosa Beach had a

Part 1 Aggravated Assault crime rate that was more than double that of Manhattan Beach.

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2016 Debate Question 6:

Hermosa Beach appears to have a history of higher rates of Part 1 violent crime, compared to Manhattan Beach.

To what do you attribute the higher violent crime numbers in Hermosa Beach, compared to Manhattan Beach?

What would you change?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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The next block of debate questions 7 thru 9 are based the following 4 documents:

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1.  PRESS RELEASE: “Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County” - 2011 – 2 page pdf

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/phcommon/public/media/mediapubdetail.cfm?unit=media&ou=ph&prog=media&resultyear=2007&prid=903&row=25&start=1

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2.  “Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County” –

A Cities and Communities Health Report - Released December 2011 – 16 page pdf

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20revised%20web%20ed.pdf

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3.  ICMA Police Operations Report for the Hermosa Beach Police Department

Released August 2013 – 56 page pdf

http://www.hermosabch.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=3785

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4.  Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue: Phase II Finance Subgroup:

A Report on the Financial/Fiscal Condition of Hermosa Beach

Released 2013 – 35 page pdf

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3542

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Debate Question 7 – Background:

This debate question is based the following:

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health Report:

“Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County - A Cities and Communities Health Report.” – December 2011

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20revised%20web%20ed.pdf

The report, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County," examines the density of alcohol outlets in 117 cities and communities across the County and highlights the relationship between alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harms.

"Excessive alcohol consumption, which includes binge drinking and heavy drinking, not only has devastating personal effects, but also takes a tremendous toll on families and communities," said Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and Health Officer.

"Increased alcohol availability contributes to abuse, leads to serious medical illnesses and impaired mental health. Drinking too much also results in increased motor vehicle crashes and violent crime, family disruptions, and impaired performance at work and school - costing Los Angeles County nearly $11 billion dollars a year."

Key findings from the report include:

--- 16 percent of county adults are binge drinkers, and one in five Los Angeles-area high school students reported binge drinking at least once in the past month

--- Communities with a high density of restaurants, bars or stores selling alcohol were much more likely to have increased rates of violent crime

Determining Alcohol Outlet Density

Information on alcohol outlets within Los Angeles County was obtained from the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control (ABC).  ABC categorizes alcohol outlets as:

- on-premises - outlets where alcohol is served to be consumed on site, e.g. bars and restaurants.

- off-premises - outlets where alcohol is sold to be consumed off site, e.g. liquor stores and grocery stores.

A total of 16,039 alcohol outlets in LA County were identified and included in the analysis.  The densities (number of outlets per 10,000 residents) of on-premises and off-premises alcohol outlets were calculated separately, and categorized into teriles of "low," medium," or "high" density.

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Data compiled from the: “Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County” report showed that:

- Hermosa Beach had 4 times the On-Premises alcohol outlet density compared to all of Los Angeles County. 

- Hermosa Beach had the 4th highest alcohol outlet density for On-Premises [On-Sale] establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

["On-Premises Establishments" or On-Sale Outlets are; Restaurants, Bars or Nightclubs, with a On-Sale ABC Alcohol License]

- Hermosa Beach had the 9th highest alcohol outlet density for Off-Premises [Off-Sale ABC License] establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report. 

["Off-Premises Establishments" or Off-Sale Outlets are; Liquor Stores, Markets or Grocery Stores, with a Off-Sale ABC Alcohol License]

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- Among the 7 South Bay cities bordering the ocean, from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes,

Hermosa Beach ranked number 1 in the rate of violent crime, among these 7 South Bay cities.

- Hermosa Beach had more than 2 times the rate of violent crime, compared to Manhattan Beach.  

- Hermosa Beach had more than 3 times the rate of violent crime, compared to Rancho Palos Verdes.

- Hermosa Beach had more than 10 times the rate of violent, crime compared to Palos Verdes Estates.

Violent Crime includes; Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Homicide.

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The following is a ranking of the violent crime rate for the:

7 South Bay Cities that border the ocean, from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes. 

Compiled from the: "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report: refer to data on pdf pages - 8, 9, 10

Ranked 1.  Hermosa Beach number 1, in Violent Crime Rate                3.5  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 2.  Redondo Beach number 2, in Violent Crime Rate                3.1  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 3.  Torrance number 3, in Violent Crime Rate                           2.3  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 4.  El Segundo number 4, in Violent Crime Rate                        2.1  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 5.  Manhattan Beach number 5, in Violent Crime Rate              1.4  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 6.  Rancho Palos Verdes number 6, in Violent Crime Rate        0.9  per 1,000 / pop.

Ranked 7.  Palos Verdes Estates number 7, in Violent Crime Rate        0.3  per 1,000 / pop.

Violent Crime includes; Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Homicide.

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The following Crime Data was obtained from:

State of California Department of Justice

Bureau of Criminal Information and Analysis

Criminal Justice Statistics Center – CJSC

Searched: "Jurisdiction" - Example Search; “Hermosa Beach” and "Misdemeanor Arrests"

CJCS Statistics Homepage:  https://oag.ca.gov/crime/cjsc/stats/arrests

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Since the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report was released in December 2011, Hermosa Beach has experienced the following crime statistics.

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For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 1.9 times the Part 1 Aggravated Assault rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 2.4 times the Part 1 Rape crime rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

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For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 2.2 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 2.59 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Redondo Beach.

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For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 3.5 times the Misdemeanor Drunk Arrest rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

For the period 2011 to 2014, Hermosa Beach had 2.9 Times the Misdemeanor Drunk Arrest rate, compared to Redondo Beach.

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2016 Debate Question 7:

Do you believe the findings in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report, regarding the relationship of alcohol outlet density to increased violent crime in a city?

How many more alcohol serving outlets should be added or expanded in the city?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Debate Question 8 – Background:

This debate question is based the following report:

ICMA Police Operations Report for the Hermosa Beach Police Department, released in August 2013.

http://www.hermosabch.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=3785

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The ICMA Police Operations Report for the Hermosa Beach Police Department, quotes:

Excerpts from pdf page 13 or Report page 5 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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Uniform Crime Report/Crime Comparisons

As defined by the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, the seven major Part I offenses are used to measure the extent, fluctuation, and distribution of serious crime. Part I crimes are the seven most serious offenses in two categories (violent and property crime).

Serious violent crime is defined as murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Serious property crime is defined as burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft.

As can be seen in Table 2, Hermosa Beach reported in 2011 a UCR Part I violent crime rate of 314 violent crimes per 100,000 residents. For UCR Part 1 property crimes, the rate in Hermosa Beach was 3,066 property crimes per 100,000 residents.

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Excerpts from pdf page 14 or Report page 6 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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TABLE 2: 2011 UCR Crime Comparisons

Looking at community crime rates, we took information from the FBI UCR Program on Crime in the United States and compared Hermosa Beach with neighboring communities and other California jurisdictions of similar populations.

For this analysis La Canada Flintridge, South El Monte, Marina, American Canyon, Arvin, and Chowchilla were used as population comparators, and Torrance, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, Lawndale, and El Segundo were used as neighboring comparators.

This analysis is meant as an illustration of communities in California and how they compare with respect to rates of crime.

Examination of the comparisons presented in Table 1 indicates that Hermosa Beach has a comparably high crime rate.

Out of the seven jurisdictions with similar population, Hermosa Beach has the 4th highest violent crime rate and the highest property crime rate. 

When compared with neighboring communities regardless of population, Hermosa Beach has the second highest rate of both violent and property crime. 

[Note: The 6 neighboring communities are: Lawndale, Hermosa Beach, Redondo Beach, El Segundo Torrance and Manhattan Beach]

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The following crime data for the Violent Crime Ranking for the 6 Neighboring South Bay Communities is compiled from:

TABLE 2: 2011 UCR Crime Comparisons”

on pdf page 14 or Report page 6 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

From ICMA Report: Violent Crime Ranking for the 6 Neighboring South Bay Communities

Ranked 1.  Lawndale number 1 in Violent Crime Rate                                528 per 100,000 pop.

Ranked 2.  Hermosa Beach number 2 in Violent Crime Rate                      314 per 100,000 pop.

Ranked 3.  Redondo Beach number 3 in Violent Crime Rate                      249 per 100,000 pop.

Ranked 4.  El Segundo number 4 in Violent Crime Rate                             226 per 100,000 pop.

Ranked 5.  Torrance number 5 in Violent Crime Rate                                126 per 100,000 pop.

Ranked 6.  Manhattan Beach number 6 in Violent Crime Rate                    124 per 100,000 pop.

“. . . Hermosa Beach has the second highest rate of both violent and property crime.”

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Excerpts from pdf page 17 or Report page 9 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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Issues Raised by Stakeholders

Staffing

• Every stakeholder group we spoke with mentioned the issue of staffing. The issue manifests itself in several ways. The greatest concern was expressed with respect to the Pier Plaza area. The feeling is that there are insufficient personnel to deal with the alcohol-related issues in the area, particularly after 10:00 p.m.

• There is a feeling, particularly among community members, that there is no police presence east of Pacific Coast Highway unless there is a call for service.

• There is a feeling among all of the sworn ranks that enforcement should be avoided in order to prevent officers being taken out of the field. Minimum staffing for patrol is described as two officers and a sergeant.

• All ranks described feeling tired and overburdened. Captains and lieutenants work overtime details to help lessen the staffing burden.

• Community members praised the department’s responsiveness and level of caring. All community members talked about lack of resources.

• Several community members noted the lack of traffic enforcement; both for moving violations and parking violations. These observations were validated by the sworn personnel.

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Excerpts from pdf page 18 or Report page 10 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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The Pier Plaza Area

• All stakeholders agree that the single biggest challenge facing the city is the alcohol-related issues being generated by the Pier Plaza bars. The Pier Plaza area is perceived as being out of control and stakeholders also perceive that there are not adequate resources to deal with the situation.

• A very common phrase, again used by all stakeholders, was that the city had created the “beach party culture” downtown and now doesn’t want to provide adequate resources to deal with this issue.

• A brief review of the daily logs suggests that alcohol abuse and other related issues are the greatest drain on patrol resources.

• There are two downtowns; one before 10:00 p.m. and one after.

• There does not seem to be any type of strategic approach to dealing with this situation.

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Excerpts from pdf page 39 or Report page 31 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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Spatial Representation of CFS Demand   [Note: CFS is “Calls for Service” Demand]

The figures presented above provide a thorough examination of the service demands placed on the HBPD during different times of the day and week.

In addition to these “temporal” demands, it is also possible to illustrate the “spatial” demands on the HBPD. Examining the spatial demands permits the exploration of where incidents are occurring.

According to Figure 9, there are three distinct “hot spots” in Hermosa Beach.

The first and largest should come as no surprise, and this is the area of Pier Plaza. Clearly, this area accounts for an overwhelming amount of service demands placed on the HBPD.

The second is in the vicinity of police headquarters. Undoubtedly, this hot spot is generated due to CFS from the police station house and the higher level of vehicular and foot traffic in this vicinity.

Third is the hot spot in the vicinity of Pacific Coast Highway and 11th Street in the vicinity of Greenwood Park and Clark Park and Ralph’s Grocery Store.

These observations point to two conclusions that support issues raised during the site visit.

First, the downtown area and the beach consume the lion’s share of resources from a service demand

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Excerpts from pdf page 40 or Report page 32 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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perspective through CFS.   [Note: CFS is “Calls for Service” Demand]

Conversely, the remaining areas of the community see low levels of CFS volume and support the contention that the non-downtown area is underserved with respect to police resources.

Indeed, the areas of the community that are NOT along major arteries or the downtown and beach areas show almost no concentrations of call volume at all.

On the positive side, the argument can be made that there are no problems in these areas in general, thus a police presence is not required.

On the negative side, in a department where almost 38 percent of the call volume is self-initiated (6580/17,381), officers are initiating a small amount of calls in these “other” areas, which undermines a community policing philosophy that is clearly central to the HBPD approach to policing the community.

FIGURE 9: Spatial Representation of CFS Demand     [Note: CFS is “Calls for Service” Demand]

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JPEG Picture of "Spatial Representation of CFS Demand" is available on pdf page 40 or Report page 32 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

http://www.hermosabch.org/Modules/ShowDocument.aspx?documentid=3785

This JPEG Picture is an Overhead View of the CFS [HBPD's Calls for Service Demand] with 3 Hot Spots, or Hight CFS Demand areas in Hermosa Beach pictured in Red on the JPEG Picture.

NOTE: The 3 CFS, [HBPD's Calls for Service] Demand, Hot Spots in Hermosa Beach are:

1.  The first and largest should come as no surprise, and this is the area of Pier Plaza. Clearly, this area accounts for an overwhelming amount of service demands placed on the HBPD.

2.  The second is in the vicinity of police headquarters. Undoubtedly, this hot spot is generated due to CFS from the police station house and the higher level of vehicular and foot traffic in this vicinity.

3.  Third is the hot spot in the vicinity of Pacific Coast Highway and 11th Street in the vicinity of Greenwood Park and Clark Park and Ralph’s Grocery Store.

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Revisiting the Rule of 60

Pulling all of these factors together, it appears that there are sufficient resources available on patrol to meet the CFS demands from the community.

ICMA contends, however, that the shift schedule in the HBPD needs to be reevaluated to make it more efficient and responsive to the needs of the community.

Restructuring the schedule and adding two officers to patrol will create a more efficient and effective patrol function which, in turn, will deliver better services to the community.

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Excerpts from pdf page 41 or Report page 33 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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Community Lead Sergeant (Nightclub Enforcement)

The downtown area is an important part of Hermosa Beach. Identified explicitly in the city’s strategic plan, an “eclectic downtown” in Hermosa Beach is envisioned as a unique and well-maintained focal point of the community, with a pedestrian-friendly atmosphere and locally owned retail and dining establishments.

Anecdotal evidence obtained during meetings with stakeholders in the community and members of the HBPD indicate that this vibrant public space often takes on a different character than the one desired by the community.

Numerous accounts were given about the raucous and rowdy nature that the downtown area exhibits during the evening hours due to the bar and nightclub scene.

Essentially, it appears that the “friendly” atmosphere sought by the community degrades into a disorderly location due to this nightlife.

The downtown area is an important part of Hermosa Beach, and the dining, shopping, and nightlife experience available in this area brings a vibrant social scene to the area and, along with the beach, is one of the “signature” characteristics of the community.

However, the area demands a substantial amount of attention.

From a strategic, tactical, and resource allocation perspective this area must be a high priority and the HBPD must have the resources available to maximize the positive and minimize the negative aspects of the area.

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 Excerpts from pdf page 42 or Report page 34 of the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD:

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Examination of CFS [Calls for Service] volume reported by the HBPD indicates that more than 20 percent of the entire CFS [Calls for Service] volume can be attributed to the downtown area.

Additionally, of all the CFS [Calls for Service] logged in the downtown area, more than 22 percent of those calls are “disturbance” calls of various types.

Essentially, one out of every twenty calls received by the HBPD are disturbance calls downtown.

Currently, the HBPD dedicates one sergeant to the downtown area. This “Community Lead Sergeant” works a shift of 1500 hours x 0300 hours, and follows the 3 on-4 off schedule, working every Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evening.

Complementing this position, the HBPD staffs three overtime shifts every Friday and Saturday night from 1900 hours to 0300 hours.

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The following crime statistics have been compiled from the:

State of California Department of Justice

Criminal Justice Statistics Center – CJSC

Searched: "Jurisdication" ex. Hermosa Beach and "Misdemeanor Arrests"

CJCS Statistics Homepage:  https://oag.ca.gov/crime/cjsc/stats/arrests

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Since the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD was released in August 2013,

Hermosa Beach has experienced the following crime statistics:

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 1.8 times the Violent Crime rate, compared to Manhattan Beach. 

Violent Crime includes; Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Homicide.

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.2 times the Part 1 Aggravated Assault crime rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 6.3 times the Part 1 Rape crime rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.3 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.8 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Redondo Beach.

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 4.0 times the Misdemeanor Drunk Arrest rate, compared to Manhattan Beach

In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.99 Times the Misdemeanor Drunk Arrest rate, compared to Redondo Beach.

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2016 Debate Question 8:

What is your opinion regarding the ICMA Police Operations Report for the HBPD?

When you become a city council member, would you leave the downtown area to function as it is now?

What staffing and enforcement strategies would you change, in the downtown area?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Debate Question 9 - Background         

According to the Community Dialogue: Phase II Finance Subgroup:

A Report on the Financial/Fiscal Condition of Hermosa Beach:

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3542

The Public Safety budget, which includes the HBPD and the HBFD, makes up about 56% of the city's yearly budget.

The report compares the Financial and Fiscal condition of 6 California coastal cities, including Hermosa Beach.

The 6 cities include; Hermosa Beach, Laguna Beach, Manhattan Beach, Rancho Palos Verdes, Sausalito and Solana Beach.

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From pdf page 6 of the report;

Hermosa has the highest crime rate, RPV the lowest

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From page 14 of the report;

Takeaways for Hermosa Beach

Highest crime rate (includes all types) even though public safety is the largest expenditure

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Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue Phase II Finance Group.pdf

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3542

Ranking of 6 California Coastal Cities, Including Crime Index –

Hermosa Beach had the highest Crime Index:
Crime Index: (Safer than X% of US Cities, Higher [Crime Index] Number is Better)

Crime Index Data From:  http://www.neighborhoodscout.com/ca/los-angeles/crime/

Data compiled from:

Community Dialogue Phase II Finance Group.pdf on pdf page 14 – Question 1 – Current Financial Condition

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Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue Phase II Finance Group –

Crime Index Comparison of 6 California Coastal Cities  

Note: Crime Index (Higher [Crime Index] Number is Better, it indicates Less Crime)

Ranked 1.  Hermosa Beach                  Number 1 with a Crime Index of 21

Ranked 2.  Laguna Beach                    Number 2 with a Crime Index of 28

Ranked 3.  Sausalito                            Number 3 with a Crime Index of 29

Ranked 4.  Manhattan Beach               Number 4 with a Crime Index of 32

Ranked 5.  Solana Beach                     Number 5 with a Crime Index of 43

Ranked 6.  Rancho Palos Verdes         Number 6 with a Crime Index of 66

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Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue Phase II Finance Group.pdf

From pdf page 15

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Takeaways for Hermosa Beach:

Annual Budget of $41 Million

• No Outstanding Debt

• No Structural Debt

• Comparatively low sales tax revenue

• Lower property taxes (less revenue for schools)

• Limited special fund revenues - other cities use special funds for sewer, water, refuse, parking, special districts, etc.

• Highest crime rate (includes all types) even though public safety is the largest expenditure

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The following crime statistics has been compiled from the:

State of California Department of Justice

CJCS Statistics Homepage:  https://oag.ca.gov/crime/cjsc/stats/arrests

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Since the Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue Phase II Finance Subgroup; report was released in 2013, Hermosa Beach has experienced the following crime statistics:

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 1.8 times the Violent Crime rate, compared to Manhattan Beach. 

          Note: Violent Crime includes; Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Homicide.

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In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.3 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Manhattan Beach.

In 2014 Hermosa Beach had 2.8 times the Misdemeanor Arrest rate, compared to Redondo Beach.

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2016 Debate Question 9:

Data from the Hermosa Beach Community Dialogue Finance Group report showed that the Public Safety budget in Hermosa Beach, which includes the HBPD and the HBFD, made up about 56% of the City's 2013-2014 yearly budget.

What are your top priorities in the next 4 years, for public safety operations in the Hermosa Beach?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Debate Question 10 - Background 

The goals of Transparency and Openness are subjects that local governments will always be working to strike the right balance. 

State and Federal laws dictate what information must be kept private and what information must be made available to the public.

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2016 Debate Question 10:

What are your thoughts on improving Transparency and Openness in the City of Hermosa Beach?

2 minute response from each City Council Candidate

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Closing Statements – 3 minutes for each Candidate’s Closing Statement

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End of the 2016 Hermosa Beach City Council Candidate Debate

 

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