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This is the HBNA Newsletter for October 2013 and 

City of Hermosa Beach 2013 Election Info



City of Hermosa Beach 2013 Election Information

Includes: All 2013 Candidate Statements & Contact Info

All Ballot Measure Info and Arguments For & Against

City of Hermosa Beach Calendar of Events

All 2013 Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates 

have this info from The HBNA Newsletter.

Other Candidate Information

Los Angeles County Dept. of Public Health Report:

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County - March 2011

PRESS RELEASE: Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County



September 5, 2013

HBNA PRESS RELEASE:

The Hermosa Beach Neighborhood Association will sponsor a Hermosa Beach City Council candidate debate to be held on Wednesday, October 2, 2013.

This city council candidate debate will take place in the Hermosa Beach City Council Chambers at 1315 Valley Drive from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 
on Wednesday, October 2, 2013.  

All Hermosa Beach residents and members of the public are invited to attend this candidate debate. 

Public Safety and Quality of Life Issues in Hermosa Beach will be among the topics addressed by each city council candidate. 

The Future of Residential and Commercial Development in Hermosa Beach will also be discussed.

This Hermosa Beach City Council candidate debate will also be broadcast live and re-aired on Time Warner cable channel 8 and Verizon FIOS channel 31   
 

For additional information you can go to the HBNA website at: www.HBneighborhood.org/

Hermosa Beach 2009 City Council Candidate Debate Video



HBNA Newsletter - October 2, 2013

From:     The Hermosa Beach Neighborhood Association

Re:        YouTube videos and other info regarding Hermosa Beach City Council Candidate Debate 



________________________________________

YouTube Videos of:

Statements, Questions and Answers from the
 

2013 Hermosa Beach Candidates Debate  


sponsored by the Hermosa Beach Neighborhood Association

held on October 2, 2013 in the City Council Chambers

_______________________________________

________________________________________

 

Hermosa Beach Treasurer Candidate Statements

City of Hermosa Beach Treasurer Candidates:

Karen Nowicki and J.R. Reviczky

YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/b3aeysJN19U

_______________________________________

Measure B Debate

Jim Lissner and Ron Newman debate Measure B


YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/PKESeYMlMLU

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Start of 2013 City Council Candidates Debate 

________________________________________ 
 

Opening Statements: 

City Council Candidate’s Opening Statement:
 

YouTube Video: 

http://youtu.be/tuoMQXoIuDI

________________________________________ 

 

Debate Question 1: 

What is your “vision” for economic development 

in the Hermosa Beach downtown and Civic Center

 

YouTube Video: 

http://youtu.be/fMw3QkVfKF4

________________________________________ 

 

Debate Question 2:

What type of mix of new commercial buildings and new businesses 

do you want to see in the future Hermosa Beach downtown area?

The maximum commercial building height in the Manhattan Beach downtown area is 26 feet.

Should building heights for new commercial buildings in Hermosa Beach

be increased beyond the current 30 foot height limit?


YouTube Video: 

http://youtu.be/F11IT9zURYI

________________________________________ 

Debate Question 3:

 

What is your opinion regarding the positive and negative impacts from oil drilling 

and oil production operations near residential neighborhoods?

 

YouTube Video:
 

http://youtu.be/QAku9uT2ZUg

________________________________________ 


Questions from the Audience: 

 

YouTube Videos of the audience questions

will be sent out in the next e-mail.

________________________________________ 

 

Debate Question 4:

 

Do you believe the findings from the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report 

regarding the relationship of alcohol outlet density to increased violent crime, 

car crashes and drinking-related deaths in a city?

 

Do you think Hermosa Beach has health related impacts caused by too many alcohol outlets?

 

YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/RDPK3_aSYAI

 

________________________________________ 

 

Debate Question 5:

How significant of a problem is alcohol-related crime in the downtown area after midnight?

Do positive impacts outweigh the negative impacts, as a result of alcohol sales 

and consumption after midnight in Hermosa Beach?

YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/5iQcZ7hYJU8

 

________________________________________ 

 

Debate Question 6:

A law passed in March 2009 in Hermosa Beach that allowed restaurants that closed by 10 p.m. the ability to obtain an ABC On-Sale Beer and Wine license “by right”. 

The 2009 “alcohol by right” law eliminated a long standing Conditional Use Permit process and the public hearings for the approval of an ABC license for a restaurant that closes at 10 pm.

Before this "alcohol by right" law was passed in 2009, all Hermosa residents and homeowners within 500 feet of the new ABC license were notified by mail and the Hermosa Beach Planning Commission held public hearings and voted to approve or deny any new ABC license to sell beer and wine in a restaurant.

The construction of a new multi-level parking garage can create 400 or more new “in lieu” parking spaces in Hermosa Beach

These new “in lieu” parking spaces, when purchased by a new restaurant operators, will allow the opening of numerous 10 pm “alcohol by right” restaurants that cannot open now, because of the lack of parking.

Should the Hermosa Beach City Council restore the Conditional Use Permit process and the holding of public hearings in order to grant any new ABC licenses for restaurants?

 

YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/yPn4TUXices

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Closing Statements:

 

City Council Candidate’s Closing Statement

 

YouTube Video:

http://youtu.be/5uNoyvDxAXs

________________________________________ 

 

End of 2013 City Council Candidate Debate 

________________________________________ 

 

________________________________________ 

 

City of Hermosa Beach Election Information and Candidate Statements for the November 5, 2013 election.

http://www.hermosabch.org/index.aspx?page=733

________________________________________ 

City Council Candidate Statements:

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3193

________________________________________ 

 

City Treasurer Candidate Statements:

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3190

________________________________________ 

 

Impartial analysis Measure B

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3179

________________________________________ 

 

Argument in Favor of Measure B

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3178

________________________________________ 

 

Argument Against Measure B

http://www.hermosabch.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=3177
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The following information was provided to  the 

Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates 

for the  HBNA Candidate  Debate

________________________________________________________________________________

 
For each year, 2011 and 2012,
the Hermosa Beach Police Department
per capita Calls for Service exceeded
Manhattan Beach PD Calls for Service
by more that 2.5 times.

 
For each year from 2006 to 2012,
Hermosa Beach exceeded Manhattan Beach
 for the per capita Part 1 crime rate for,
Rape, Robbery, Aggravated Assault and Burglary.

 
For the period, 2009 thru 2012 Hermosa Beach
had per capita Part 1 Rape crime rate that was
more than double that of Manhattan Beach.

 
For the period, 2009 thru 2012 Hermosa Beach
had per capita Part 1 Aggravated Assault crime rate that was
more than double that of Manhattan Beach.

 
For the period, 2006 thru 2009 Hermosa Beach
had a per capita Part 1 Aggravated Asaault crime rate
that was more than 3 times that of Manhattan Beach.

 
For the period, 2008 thru 2011 Hermosa Beach
had a per capita Part 1 Robbery crime rate that was
more than 50 percent higher than Manhattan Beach.

________________________________________________________________________________

From the County of Los Angeles Public Health Department Report:

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20revised%20web%20ed.pdf

A Cities and Community Health Report - 16 pages

Revised Edition, December 2011

Press Release: Los Angeles County Dept. of Public Health

For the: Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/phcommon/public/media/mediapubdetail.cfm?

unit=media&ou=ph&prog=media&resultyear=2007&prid=903&row=25&start=1

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___________________________________________________

Quotes and Hermosa Beach information from the:

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology.

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County: A Cities and Communities Report.  March 2011.

You can print out a pdf of the

"Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" 

report from this weblink:

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

or this weblink:

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/

The City of Hermosa Beach was included in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report, which includes 117 cities and communities in Los Angeles County.

Here is a quote from paragraph 4 of a 5 paragraph statement from Jonathan E. Fielding, Director of Public Health and Health Officer, from page 2 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County":

"A high density of alcohol outlets increases alcohol consumption, 
motor vehicle crashes, alcohol-related hospital admissions, injury deaths, 
assaults and violent crime, suicides, drinking and driving, child maltreatment 
and neighborhood disturbances.  

In this report, we examined the relationship between the density of alcohol outlets and three alcohol-related harms in 117 cities and communities across Los Angeles County 

and found similar results; increased rates of violent crime, alcohol-involved motor vehicle crashes, and alcohol related deaths were all associated with having a high density of alcohol outlets in that city or community."

Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH

Director of Public Health and Health Officer

Quote from page 6 of the pdf "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

"Communities with a high density of either On- or Off-Premises outlets were . . 9 to 10 times more likely to have increased rates of violent crime"

Quotes from page 11 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

"Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major public health concern 
among teenagers and adults in Los Angeles County
with significant health and economic impacts.  

These impacts include societal harms not only from illnesses, 
but also due to injuries, violent crimes and property crimes, 
traffic accidents, work loss, and community and family disruptions."

"The findings in this analysis are consistent with previous studies which have shown significant associations between alcohol availability and alcohol-related harms.  

For example, environmental factors such as the density of alcohol outlets 
have been found to play an important role in teenage drinking.  

Among  teenagers in California, binge drinking and driving after drinking 
have been associated with the availability of alcohol outlets within a half-mile from home."

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___________________________________________________

Data compiled from page 6 to page 10 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

- Hermosa Beach had more than double the rate of violent 

crime compared to Manhattan Beach.   pdf pages - 8, 9

    Hermosa Beach had 3.5 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

    Manhattan Beach had 1.4 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Hermosa Beach had 4 times the On-Premises alcohol outlet density 

compared to all of Los Angeles County.  pdf page - 7

    Hermosa Beach had 38.6 On-Premises establishments per 10,000 residents

    Los Angeles County had 8.9 On-Premises establishments per 10,000 residents


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The following is a ranking of the violent crime rate for the 7 South Bay Cities that border the ocean, from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes.  

Compiled from the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.    pdf pages - 8, 9, 10


The following is a ranking of the violent crime rate
for the 7 South Bay Cities that border the ocean,
from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes.  

- Among the 7 South Bay cities bordering the ocean, 

from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes,

 
Hermosa Beach ranked number 1 in the rate of violent crime.
      
 

pdf pages - 8, 9, 10

- Hermosa Beach ranked number 1 in the violent crime rate

and had 3.5 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Redondo Beach ranked number 2 in the violent crime rate

and had 3.1 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Torrance ranked number 3 in the violent crime rate

and had 2.3 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- El Segundo ranked number 4 in the violent crime rate

and had 2.1 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Manhattan Beach ranked number 5 in the violent crime rate

and had 1.4 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Rancho Palos Verdes ranked number 6 in the violent crime rate

and had 0.9 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Palos Verdes Estates ranked number 7 in the violent crime rate 

and had 0.3 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

      From:  "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.       pdf page - 15

Reference 21:

Aggregated data from State of California Department of Justice, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, and City of Los Angeles Police Department, for 2006-2008.  

Violent crimes include aggravated assault, homicide, rape, and robbery.

- Hermosa Beach had the 4th highest alcohol outlet density for On-Premises establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.    pdf pages - 7, 8

    Hermosa Beach ranked 114 for On-Premises Alcohol Outlet Density, 

out of the total of 117 cities and communities in the report.

 - Hermosa Beach had the 9th highest alcohol outlet density for Off-Premises establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the 

"Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.   pdf pages - 7, 8

    Hermosa Beach ranked 109 for Off-Premises Alcohol Outlet Density, 

out of the total of 117 cities and communities in the report.

___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

Public Health News

County of Los Angeles Public Health

313 N. Figueroa Street, Room 806 | Los Angeles, CA 90012

___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

For Immediate Release:

April 21, 2011  For more information contact:

Public Health Communications

(213) 240-8144 | After-hours/wknds: (213) 990-7107

Greater Alcohol Availability Associated with Increase in 
Violent Crime, Car Crashes, and Drinking-Related Deaths

Report examines relationship between alcohol outlet density 
by community and alcohol-related harms

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

LOS ANGELES - Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major public health problem among teenagers and adults in Los Angeles County

According to a report released by the Department of Public Health today, each year 2,500 people in the county die from alcohol-related causes, with the loss of approximately 78,000 years of potential life. It is the second-leading cause of premature death and disability in the county.

The report, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County," examines the density of alcohol outlets in 117 cities and communities across the County and highlights 

the relationship between alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harms.

"Excessive alcohol consumption, which includes binge drinking and heavy drinking, not only has devastating personal effects, but also takes a tremendous toll on families and communities," 

said Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and Health Officer.

"Increased alcohol availability contributes to abuse, leads to serious medical illnesses and impaired mental health. Drinking too much also results in increased motor vehicle crashes and violent crime, family disruptions, and impaired performance at work and school 

- costing Los Angeles County nearly $11 billion dollars a year."

Key findings from the report include:

- 16 percent of county adults are binge drinkers, and one in five Los Angeles-area 
high school students reported binge drinking at least once in the past month

- Communities with a high density of restaurants, bars or stores selling 
alcohol were much more likely to have increased rates of violent crime

- Communities with a high density of outlets where patrons can consume alcohol 
were three times more likely to have increased rates of alcohol-involved vehicle crashes

- Communities with a high density of outlets where alcoholic beverages are sold for consumption elsewhere were five times more likely to have increased rates of alcohol-related deaths

"Alcohol is the most frequently used drug among teenagers and is a 
leading cause of death from injuries among people under the age of 21," 
said John Viernes, Jr., Director of Substance Abuse Prevention and Control, 
Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. 

"Preventing and reducing underage drinking, which increases 
the risk of alcohol- related problems later in life, is especially important. 

We would like to work closely with communities to take preventive actions at the community level."

___________________________________________________

___________________________________________________

The report lists several strategies communities can use 

to reduce alcohol-related consequences including:

- Implementing and enforcing local ordinances to limit alcohol outlet density.

- Restricting the availability and accessibility of alcohol to minors.

- Reducing youth exposure to alcohol advertising.

- Ensuring compliance with responsible sales and serving practices.

- Providing education to youth on the hazards of alcohol and the legal and social consequences of use.

- Improving access to mental health and substance abuse services.

For a full copy of the report, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County", 

log onto the Public Health website at http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/sapc.

The Department of Public Health is committed to protecting and improving 
the health of the nearly 10 million residents of Los Angeles County

Through a variety of programs, community partnerships and services, Public Health oversees environmental health, disease control, and community and family health.

Public Health comprises more than 4,000 employees 

and has an annual budget exceeding $750 million.

To learn more about Public Health and the work we do, please visit

http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov, visit our YouTube channel at

http://www.youtube.com/lapublichealth, or follow us on Twitter: LAPublicHealth.


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________________________________________________________________________________

This is the HBNA Newsletter for October 2011 and 

City of Hermosa Beach 2011 Election Info

Greetings Hermosa Beach neighbors, 

I hope all is well.

This is the latest HBNA Newsletter that all of the Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates have just received.

In this e-mail there are YouTube videos and other information that relate to the HBNA Debate questions 5 and 6.

The HBNA Candidate Debate will take place this Wednesday, October 5, 2011 at 7 pm at the City Council Chambers.

The HBNA Debate will be aired live and replay daily on Time Warner ch 8 FIOS ch 31.

Please reply to this e-mail, if you have any questions for the Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates.

If you want to be removed from this e-mail list, then Type, Remove in the Subject Line, or in the Body of the e-mail.

Best regards,

The HBNA



If you find The HBNA Newsletter informative, you may want to forward this e-mail to your neighbors.

You can contact the Hermosa Beach City Council candidates by phone or e-mail.

This is the official contact page and the Hermosa Beach 2011 election page:

City of Hermosa Beach 2013 Election Information

Includes: All 2013 Candidate Statements & Contact Info

_________________________________________________

Debate Question 5:

Hermosa Beach and Manhattan Beach were both listed as having a “High Level” of alcohol outlet density.  Data from the report showed that Hermosa Beach had more than double the rate of violent crime compared to Manhattan Beach .   

In the past the HBPD has stated that over-crowding, over-serving and under-age drinking were problems that had to be dealt with.

Does over-crowding, over-serving and under-age drinking continue to be problem in Hermosa Beach ?

__________________________________________________

 
 
Debate Question 6:

 
One of the recommendations from the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County " report was to:

"Ensure compliance with responsible sales and serving practices."

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

Would strict enforcement of the 50-50 law with verified documentation; reduce the alcohol related problems that the HBPD has to deal, from restaurants that over-serve alcohol?

 __________________________________________________

 __________________________________________________

YouTube Title:

CDubs 4th of July 2011 at the Ocean Bar Hermosa Beach

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cy_QekrNYrA

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

Ocean Bar Summer 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZchhHyp8g8

1 min 

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

Quintal de casa, Sharkeez Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles, CA 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ge6im5PuAa8

2 min 5 sec

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

The Shore Hermosa Promo Video

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPVUmRZMLCw

3 min 30 sec

__________________________________________________

.



If you find The HBNA Newsletter informative, you may want to forward this e-mail to your neighbors.

You can contact the Hermosa Beach City Council candidates by phone or e-mail.

This is the official contact page and the Hermosa Beach 2011 election page:

City of Hermosa Beach 2013 Election Information

Includes: All 2013 Candidate Statements & Contact Info

_________________________________________________

 __________________________________________________

 __________________________________________________

City of Hermosa Beach Municipal Code 

http://www.hermosabch.org/departments/cityclerk/code/

ZONING
Chapter 17.04
DEFINITIONS

http://www.hermosabch.org/departments/cityclerk/code/1704.html#040

17.04. 050  Commercial land use definitions.

http://www.hermosabch.org/departments/cityclerk/code/1704.html#050

Alcohol Beverage Establishment, On-Sale. "On-sale alcohol beverage establishment" means sale of alcoholic beverages (beer, wine, spirits) for consumption on the premises whether in conjunction with a restaurant, or as a bar or cocktail lounge or in conjunction with a nightclub (see definition of "restaurant").

"Restaurant" means an establishment which primarily sells prepared food. Where beer and wine are sold, a minimum of sixty-five (65) percent of the total gross sales, computed monthly, shall result from the sale of prepared food; where other alcoholic beverages, not exclusively beer and wine, are sold, a minimum of fifty (50) percent of the total gross sales, computed monthly, shall result from the sale of prepared food. The establishment shall serve either one of the following: breakfast, lunch or dinner or has a kitchen with equipment capable of serving breakfast, lunch or dinner.

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Hermosa Beach Municipal Code 17.04. 050  Commercial land use definitions.

Alcohol Beverage Establishment, On-Sale, as a "Restaurant"

“. . . where other alcoholic beverages, not exclusively beer and wine, are sold, a minimum of fifty (50) percent of the total gross sales, computed monthly, shall result from the sale of prepared food. 

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The following YouTube videos appear to be Hermosa Beach Alcohol Beverage Establishments or Restaurants:

The following YouTube Videos may show, or appear to have:

- Over-Crowding of Interior Restaurant Space and Obstruction of  Exits

- The use of Flares or Pyro-Technic Devices inside a Restaurant for Entertainment

- The unobstructed 4 foot path of entry and egress aisles, that is required by Fire Code, is obstructed

- Stairs and Doorways that are obstructed, along with No Use of the Interior Lighting

- All taking place inside what appears to be, or may be Hermosa Beach alcohol serving restaurants, where: "a minimum of fifty (50) percent of the total gross sales, computed monthly, shall result from the sale of prepared food."

Some of the YouTube videos in this e-mail, appear to have young Female Fashion Models, Dancing in Various Stages of Undress, with Body-Makeup Used as One Would Use Clothing.

The fashion event on the YouTube videos appears to have the name:

FIN - Fashion Industry Night - FULL RUNWAY FASHION SHOW AND LIVE ART SHOWCASE

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YouTube Video Title:

CDubs 4th of July 2011 at the Ocean Bar Hermosa Beach

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cy_QekrNYrA

3 min 38 sec 

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

Ocean Bar Summer 2011

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZchhHyp8g8

1 min 

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

Quintal de casa, Sharkeez Hermosa Beach, Los Angeles, CA 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ge6im5PuAa8

2 min 5 sec

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

The Shore Hermosa Promo Video

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UPVUmRZMLCw

3 min 30 sec

__________________________________________________
_________________________________________________

The following YouTube videos, appear to have young Female Fashion Models, Dancing in Various Stages of Undress, with Body-Makeup Used as One Would Use Clothing.

__________________________________________________

YouTube Videos:

FIN – Fashion Industry Night Hermosa Beach

FULL RUNWAY FASHION SHOW AND LIVE ART SHOWCASE

__________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

F.I.N. at sharkeez

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Skc9hZyFSFY

 20 sec

 __________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

FIN at Sharkeez Hermosa Beach

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxE1__i2f3k      

1 min

 __________________________________________________

YouTube Video Title:

FIN Sharkeez Hermosa Beach

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9AOPZ817qlw

 59 Sec

__________________________________________________

FIN - Fashion Industry Night

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

FULL RUNWAY FASHION SHOW AND LIVE ART SHOWCASE

http://konatanningcompany.blogspot.com/2010/08/baja-sharkeez-newport-beach-fashion.html

Baja Sharkeez Newport Beach Fashion Industry Night

Newport Beach, CA – August 13, 2010 – Baja Sharkeez today announced:
Baja Sharkeez Newport Beach will be bringing back their monthly fashion shows, under the former moniker FMM (Fashion Mogul Monday, created by Sharkeez Marketing Director Jeff Ganz). With a new twist and layout, Sharkeez now presents Fashion Industry Night (FiN).

Since the beginning of the year Sharkeez Hermosa Beach has been hosting a similar show featuring local designers, artists, and stylists. Music, fashion, and art are the main focus for the evening.

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Fashion Industry Night – Photography

FiN fashion industry night-Embodiment at Sharkeez in Hermosa Beach. Photos taken for Skinnie Magazine.

http://www.jugonphotography.com/Events/Sharkeez-Hermosa-52410/12326833_qop3V#880354829_mQgyN

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FiN - Fashion Industry Night & Fashion Show @ sharkeez: Monday, November 16 - 8PM


After Monday Night Football is over Sharkeez Hermosa brings the South Bay the most unique and upscale event it has ever seen! Once a month we feature FiN - Fashion Industry Night, with a Full Runway Fashion Show, Art Gallery and so much more dedicated to all of the hard working individuals from local salons, boutiques, clothing stores and even local artists. Come check out the next one and see what its all about! Monday, Nov. 16th 8PM

http://www.southbayevents.com/events/special_event_details.asp?event_id=543

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If you want to contact by phone or e-mail, the Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates, is the official contact page:

http://www.hermosabch.org/elected/elections/election20111108.html

Post Your Questions For The CIty Council Candiates

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All of the following crime numbers were compiled from the HBPD Monthly Report - July-2011: 

http://www.hermosabch.org/police/july2011.html

Monthly Year to Date Statistics - HBPD

Hermosa Beach Police Department
Monthly Report

July - 2011

 

For the first seven months including January to July YTD  (Year to Date)

January 2010 thru YTD July 2010

Compared To:

January 2011 thru YTD July 2011
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Sex Crimes - January to July

3 Sex Crimes thru YTD July 2010
5 Sex Crimes thru YTD July 2011 ----------Sex Crimes Increased 66%

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Assault - January to July

46 Assaults thru YTD July 2010
60 Assaults thru YTD July 2011 ---------------Assaults Increased 30%

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Burglary - January to July

58 Burglaries thru YTD July 2010
76 Burglaries thru YTD July 2011 -------------Burglary Increased 31%

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D.U.I. (Driving Under the Influence)- January to July

128 D.U.I. thru YTD July 2010
173 D.U.I. thru YTD July 2011 --------------------DUI Increased 35 % 

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Adults Arrested - January to July

392 Adults Arrested thru YTD July 2010
472 Adults Arrested thru YTD July 2011 -------Adults Arrested Increased 20%
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Daily Breeze – September 28, 2011

Police Log –

Hermosa Beach

Robbery - 12:20 a.m. Sept. 25, 1300 block of Bonnie Brae Street.  The female victim was forced to the ground by a male assailant, who took the victim's cash, iPhone and black purse and then ran.

Robbery - 12:47 a.m. Sept. 25, 1500 block of Monterey Boulevard.  A woman parked her vehicle and started walking southbound in the 1600 block of Monterey.  At the intersection of 16th Street and Monterey, a male assailant pointed a gun at her and demanded her purse.  The victim dropped her purse and ran.  The assailant was not found.

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The Beach Reporter - September 22, 2011

ROBBERIES. An unidentified suspect pushed the victim down as she was approaching the front door of her residence in the 1800 block of Manhattan Avenue and took her purse. She was only able to describe the suspect as a male.

An unknown suspect took the victim’s phone by force while she was holding it in the 300 block of Pacific Coast Highway and fled on foot.

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Daily Breeze – September 21, 2011

Angry driver allegedly runs down pedestrian in Hermosa Beach

By Larry Altman Staff Writer

Posted: 09/20/2011 12:24:14 PM PDT

Updated: 09/20/2011 03:14:43 PM PDT

A Redondo Beach motorist allegedly ran down a pedestrian with his car when the man questioned his driving skills at a Hermosa Beach crosswalk, police said Tuesday. 

Jared Montes Polk, 25, allegedly struck the victim about Sunday evening in the 400 block of Pier Avenue, Hermosa Beach police Detective Mick Gaglia said. 

"As far as we can tell, it was just out of anger," Gaglia said.  Two men were crossing the street about 9:15 p.m. when Polk, driving a black Honda Element, screeched to a stop and nearly hit them, Gaglia said.

After one of the men questioned Polk about his actions, Polk allegedly backed up about 20 feet, repositioned his car in the lane and drove directly at the men.   One leaped to avoid being hit. The other man, who recently had knee surgery, was unable to get out of the way and was struck.

The victim rolled up onto the car's hood and tumbled onto the pavement, Gaglia said.   The car then drove away.

The victim was not seriously injured. He suffered scrapes to his arm, leg and the palms of his hands, but did not require hospitalization.

"He was somewhat lucky," Gaglia said. "He could have died."   He did not require hospitalization.

Police tracked Polk to Redondo Beach and arrested him on suspicion of assault with a deadly weapon.   Polk was booked at the Hermosa Beach jail, but was released Monday after posting $30,000 bail, records showed.

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The Beach Reporter – July 21, 2011

Hermosa Beach – Crime Watch

ASSAULT WITH A DEADLY WEAPON. A suspected DUI driver was followed by a police patrol car at First Street and Pacific Coast Highway. The patrol car observed the car commit a traffic violation. Prior to the officer pulling the suspect vehicle over, the driver of the suspect vehicle began yelling at the occupants of an uninvolved vehicle and then intentionally rammed their vehicle into the other vehicle.

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Quotes and Hermosa Beach information from the:

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, Office of Health Assessment and Epidemiology.

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County: A Cities and Communities Report.  March 2011.

You can print out a pdf of the"Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report from this weblink:

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

or this weblink:

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/

The City of Hermosa Beach was included in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report, which includes 117 cities and communities in Los Angeles County.

Here is a quote from paragraph 4 of a 5 paragraph statement from Jonathan E. Fielding, Director of Public Health and Health Officer, from page 2 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County":

"A high density of alcohol outlets increases alcohol consumption, motor vehicle crashes, alcohol-related hospital admissions, injury deaths, assaults and violent crime, suicides, drinking and driving, child maltreatment and neighborhood disturbances.  In this report, we examined the relationship between the density of alcohol outlets and three alcohol-related harms in 117 cities and communities across Los Angeles County and found similar results; increased rates of violent crime, alcohol-involved motor vehicle crashes, and alcohol related deaths were all associated with having a high density of alcohol outlets in that city or community."

Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH

Director of Public Health and Health Officer

Quote from page 6 of the pdf "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

"Communities with a high density of either On- or Off-Premises outlets were . . 9 to 10 times more likely to have increased rates of violent crime"

Quotes from page 11 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

"Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major public health concern among teenagers and adults in Los Angeles County, with significant health and economic impacts.  These impacts include societal harms not only from illnesses, but also due to injuries, violent crimes and property crimes, traffic accidents, work loss, and community and family disruptions."

"The findings in this analysis are consistent with previous studies which have shown significant associations between alcohol availability and alcohol-related harms.  For example, environmental factors such as the density of alcohol outlets have been found to play an important role in teenage drinking.  Among  teenagers in California, binge drinking and driving after drinking have been associated with the availability of alcohol outlets within a half-mile from home."

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Take the Hermosa Beach Community Survey Online

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Data compiled from page 6 to page 10 of the pdf, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

- Hermosa Beach had more than double the rate of violent crime compared to Manhattan Beach.   pdf pages - 8, 9

    Hermosa Beach had 3.5 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

    Manhattan Beach had 1.4 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Hermosa Beach had 4 times the On-Premises alcohol outlet density compared to all of Los Angeles Countypdf page - 7

    Hermosa Beach had 38.6 On-Premises establishments per 10,000 residents

    Los Angeles County had 8.9 On-Premises establishments per 10,000 residents

 

- Among the 7 South Bay cities bordering the ocean, from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes, Hermosa Beach ranked number 1 in the rate of violent crime.        pdf pages - 8, 9, 10

The following is a ranking of the violent crime rate for the 7 South Bay Cities that border the ocean, from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes.  Compiled from the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.    pdf pages - 8, 9, 10

- Hermosa Beach ranked number 1, and had 3.5 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Redondo Beach ranked number 2, and had 3.1 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Torrance ranked number 3, and had 2.3 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- El Segundo ranked number 4, and had 2.1 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Manhattan Beach ranked number 5, and had 1.4 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Rancho Palos Verdes ranked number 6, and had 0.9 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

- Palos Verdes Estates ranked number 7, and had 0.3 violent crimes per 1000 of population.

        "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.       pdf page - 15

Reference 21:

Aggregated data from State of California Department of Justice, Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, and City of Los Angeles Police Department, for 2006-2008.  Violent crimes include aggravated assault, homicide, rape, and robbery.

- Hermosa Beach had the 4th highest alcohol outlet density for On-Premises establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.    pdf pages - 7, 8

    Hermosa Beach ranked 114 for On-Premises AOD, out of the total of 117 cities and communities in the report.

 - Hermosa Beach had the 9th highest alcohol outlet density for Off-Premises establishments, comparing the 117 cities and communities in the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report.   pdf pages - 7, 8

    Hermosa Beach ranked 109 for Off-Premises AOD, out of the total of 117 cities and communities in the report.

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Public Health News

County of Los Angeles Public Health

313 N. Figueroa Street, Room 806 | Los Angeles, CA 90012

For Immediate Release:

April 21, 2011  For more information contact:

Public Health Communications

(213) 240-8144 | After-hours/wknds: (213) 990-7107

media@ph.lacounty.gov

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/phcommon/public/media/mediapubdetail.cfm?unit=media&ou=ph&prog=media&resultyear=2007&prid=903&row=25&start=1

Greater Alcohol Availability Associated with Increase in Violent Crime, Car Crashes, and Drinking-Related Deaths

Report examines relationship between alcohol outlet density by community and alcohol-related harms

http://www.lapublichealth.org/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

LOS ANGELES - Excessive consumption of alcohol is a major public health problem among teenagers and adults in Los Angeles County. According to a report released by the Department of Public Health today, each year 2,500 people in the county die from alcohol-related causes, with the loss of approximately 78,000 years of potential life. It is the second-leading cause of premature death and disability in the county.

The report, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County," examines the density of alcohol outlets in 117 cities and communities across the County and highlights the relationship between alcohol outlet density and alcohol-related harms.

"Excessive alcohol consumption, which includes binge drinking and heavy drinking, not only has devastating personal effects, but also takes a tremendous toll on families and communities," said Jonathan E. Fielding, MD, MPH, Director of Public Health and Health Officer.

"Increased alcohol availability contributes to abuse, leads to serious medical illnesses and impaired mental health. Drinking too much also results in increased motor vehicle crashes and violent crime, family disruptions, and impaired performance at work and school - costing Los Angeles County nearly $11 billion dollars a year."

Key findings from the report include:

- 16 percent of county adults are binge drinkers, and one in five Los Angeles-area high school students reported binge drinking at least once in the past month

- Communities with a high density of restaurants, bars or stores selling alcohol were much more likely to have increased rates of violent crime

- Communities with a high density of outlets where patrons can consume alcohol were three times more likely to have increased rates of alcohol-involved vehicle crashes

- Communities with a high density of outlets where alcoholic beverages are sold for consumption elsewhere were five times more likely to have increased rates of alcohol-related deaths

"Alcohol is the most frequently used drug among teenagers and is a leading cause of death from injuries among people under the age of 21," said John Viernes, Jr., Director of Substance Abuse Prevention and Control, Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. "Preventing and reducing underage drinking, which increases the risk of alcohol- related problems later in life, is especially important. We would like to work closely with communities to take preventive actions at the community level."

The report lists several strategies communities can use to reduce alcohol-related consequences including:

- Implementing and enforcing local ordinances to limit alcohol outlet density.

- Restricting the availability and accessibility of alcohol to minors.

- Reducing youth exposure to alcohol advertising.

- Ensuring compliance with responsible sales and serving practices.

- Providing education to youth on the hazards of alcohol and the legal and social consequences of use.

- Improving access to mental health and substance abuse services.

For a full copy of the report, "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County", log onto the Public Health website at http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/sapc.

The Department of Public Health is committed to protecting and improving the health of the nearly 10 million residents of Los Angeles County. Through a variety of programs, community partnerships and services, Public Health oversees environmental health, disease control, and community and family health.

Public Health comprises more than 4,000 employees and has an annual budget exceeding $750 million. To learn more about Public Health and the work we do, please visit http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov, visit our YouTube channel at http://www.youtube.com/lapublichealth, or follow us on Twitter: LAPublicHealth.

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Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

SAMHSA/CSAP Prevention Enhancement Protocols. Rockville (MD):

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK16487/


1: Public Health and Safety Problems Related to Alcohol Availability

The most effective prevention methods target the broad community problems caused by alcohol abuse.

Throughout its history, the United States has attempted to minimize the social problems that arise from the distribution, sale, and use of alcohol; over the course of two and a quarter centuries a variety of Federal, State, and local initiatives have been tried to prevent the alcohol-related problems that threaten public health and safety. For all their good intentions, however, many of these efforts have narrowly focused on managing individual alcohol outlets that serve customers to the point of intoxication, that sell alcohol to underage youth, or that threaten neighborhood safety, overlooking the larger environmental factors that are both more subtle and more pervasive. Effective prevention interventions must target not only specific problem drinkers and alcohol retailers but the broader communities they inhabit.

alcohol outlet - a business or location where alcoholic beverages are sold to the public or to a select membership.

According to a 1990 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) report, the most effective State and local approaches to solving the problems associated with alcohol use are those that involve the full range of community systems: health, education, transportation, law, engineering, architecture, and public safety. The participation of concerned citizens, community groups, and alcohol retailers themselves can also help with problems related to the distribution and sale of alcoholic beverages.

This guide focuses on broad, environmental approaches to prevention that take into account everything from social and economic factors to land use, framed by the public health model described by Fagan (1993a, b). Fagan's model emphasizes identifying the settings and circumstances within communities at highest risk for alcohol-related problems and applying interventions that address the links between problem behaviors and environmental factors.

This first chapter of the guide defines the terms used, presents data on alcohol-related problems, and their effects on public health. It also offers an assessment of community involvement in prevention efforts.

Alcohol Problems and Public Health Safety

The publication Healthy People 2000 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 1990), part of the Federal Government's initiative to reduce the incidence, prevalence, and consequences of high-priority health problems, indicated that alcohol use contributes to morbidity, injuries, and mortality from cirrhosis of the liver - the Nation's ninth leading cause of death - vehicular and workplace accidents, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, and homicides and suicides.

The consequences of alcohol abuse call for government and community efforts in myriad areas: dealing with drunk-driving accidents; handling alcohol-related crime; treating alcohol dependence and related medical problems, including secondary consequences such as fetal alcohol syndrome; and making up for lost productivity from workers who are impaired, incarcerated, victims of crime, in need of medical treatment, or dead before their time due to alcohol. In addition to the tragedy is enormous expense: the economic costs of alcohol abuse in the United States came to approximately $99 billion in 1990 and were projected to reach $124 billion by 1997 (Parsons and Kamenca 1993; Rice 1993).

Alcohol and Non-Vehicular Trauma

People who abuse alcohol are both more likely to be involved in physically traumatic events and more likely to be seriously hurt in them than nondrinkers are. In fact, according to the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (Stussman 1997), more than half of all emergency-room visits associated with alcohol or drug use involve traumatic injuries. The report also notes that individuals who die from injuries are more likely to have used alcohol more frequently and heavily than are those who die from disease.

Other studies indicate that alcohol is a factor in 21 to 47 percent of drownings, 35 to 63 percent of deaths from falls, and 12 to 61 percent of fire-related deaths (Hingson and Howland 1993). Burn victims with blood alcohol concentrations (BAC's) above 0.06 percent were more than twice as likely to die as burn victims with BAC's of 0.06 or less (Haum et al. 1995).

Alcohol abuse is particularly prevalent among patients with head trauma. Research findings vary, but generally indicate that more than 50 percent of those who sustain head injuries were drinking alcohol before or at the time of injury (Kraus 1993). To put the consequences in hard dollar terms, in 1994 the National Head Injury Foundation estimated the lifetime medical expenses for a person with a severe head injury at $4.6 million.

Alcohol, Crime, and Violence

The use of alcohol is indisputably associated with homicide, sexual and other assault, domestic violence, and child abuse (Roizen 1997). A review of several studies of drinking patterns and homicides shows that 7 to 85 percent of murderers had been drinking when they committed their crimes; most of the studies reported that 60 percent of homicide offenders were drinking at the time of the offense (Murdoch, Pihl, and Ross 1990). A study of police reports in northern Ontario revealed that among the several hundred incidents reported by community residents, 20 percent involved marital abuse, in which 44 percent of the assailants and 14 percent of the victims had been drinking (Pernanen 1991).

According to a 1990 study by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), alcohol also has factored in approximately a third of all suicides. In addition, positive blood alcohol levels are frequently found among victims of drug overdoses (Commonwealth of Massachusetts 1995).

Alcohol and Youth

Nationwide studies report that more than half of America's 8th graders and 80 percent of 12th graders have tried alcohol, even though buying it is illegal for anyone under 21. Even worse, heavy drinking is reported by 15 percent of 8th graders, 28 percent of 12th graders, and 34 percent of college students (Johnston, O'Malley, and Bachman 1995). While these percentages appear to be on the decline, they remain disturbingly high. Comparing data from 1990 with 1984 surveys, Midanik and Clark (1995) reported a significant increase among 18- to 29-year-olds who have experienced two or more negative social consequences due to drinking. Among all age groups, these young adults also comprised the highest percentage of individuals classified as alcohol abusers and alcohol dependents (Catalano and Room 1994; Grant et al. 1994).

Among young people in particular, alcohol use is known to be associated with a decreased likelihood of condom use and other measures to prevent pregnancy and disease transmission from sexual intercourse (Strunin and Hingson 1992). Heavy consumption of alcohol along with other drug use is also associated with poor school performance, high school dropout, and problems with work productivity later in life (Cook and Moore 1992). Young people entering the work force immediately after high school tend to maintain the drinking patterns established in their last school years; approximately 30 percent report that they are heavy drinkers (Harford 1993).

A survey at 140 colleges found that 44 percent of students reported binge drinking, defined as five or more drinks per sitting. Frequent binge drinkers were 10 times more likely than non-binge drinkers to report trouble with campus police, damages to property, injuries, and unplanned or unprotected sex (Wechsler et al. 1994). A nationwide survey of students in grades 9 through 12 found that the prevalence of drinking and driving increased substantially with alcohol use and especially binge drinking (Escobedo, Chorba, and Waxweilen 1995).

Alcohol Consumption and Related Problems

It is clear that an individual's level of consumption is related to the nature and extent of any problems that result from alcohol use, as demonstrated by risk function analysis, which looks at relationships between volumes of alcohol consumed and the social consequences (NIAAA 1997). A report by Room, Bondy, and Ferris (1995) states that in six life areas, the probability of harm rises steadily with the respondent's alcohol consumption. Considering similar findings by other researchers, Edwards et al. (1994) observe that the lessons "for the individual and society are outstandingly clear - less is better, more drinking carries more risk for a wide range of adverse happenings, and heavy drinking is distinctly dangerous behavior" (p. 68).

The health and social problems associated with alcohol do not apply only to individuals who are clinically dependent on alcoholabout 7 percent of the population (Moore and Gerstein 1981). In fact, many problems occur among individuals who are not dependent on alcohol, while many others use alcohol without experiencing negative health consequences (NIAAA 1993). But problems also occur as a result of community tolerance of the social and economic norms for alcohol availability and use. Therefore, understanding the risks can play a significant role in shaping a community's response to alcohol-related problems.

Researchers in the field are looking for effective methods to curtail these problems while at the same time allowing for the responsible and appropriate distribution of alcohol. This Reference Guide analyzes research and practice findings on efforts to manage alcohol availability and synthesizes the available knowledge on the effectiveness of these approaches in solving specific problems.

Forms of Alcohol Availability and Related Terms

Three forms of alcohol availability are of particular interest to local communities concerned with alcohol-related problems. In this guide, the term availability refers primarily to the means by which alcohol is made available at the community level. As broken down by Wittman and Shane (1988), this includes retail availability (commercial alcohol outlets), public availability (alcohol at public events and in public places), and social availability (alcohol served privately according to social customs and traditions):

Public Availability. Alcohol is often available at public events and in public places that are the responsibility of agencies such as city parks departments. Public availability is usually controlled by local jurisdictions, but State Alcoholic Beverage Control Boards 1 (ABC's) may also control availability if alcohol is sold to the public or is available at State-sponsored events or locations. Public agencies also influence availability through their drinking policies for employees and by hosting social events at which alcohol may be present. The relationships among alcohol's public availability, consumption, and public health problems are of relatively recent interest and have not been the subject of extensive research, except in Canada.

Retail Availability. Alcohol available by commercial sale affects communities in a number of ways. Considerations relevant to retail availability include economic factors (price), the density of outlets in a given area, types of outlets (defined in the following section), conditions of sale (serving practices), hours and days of sale, and the issuance of one-day and other short-term licenses for serving alcohol. Retail availability is controlled by both State and local jurisdictions. The relationships among retail availability, consumption of alcohol, and public health problems are of longstanding interest to researchers and are the primary focus of this guide.

Social Availability. Hardest to quantify, alcohol's social availability in any given community depends on the accepted norms for drinking at private events established through the community's history, culture, and beliefs. A number of studies have defined social availability and discussed its relationship to other forms of availability (Abbey et al. 1990; Calahan, Cisin, and Crossley 1969; Rabow et al. 1982; Room and Roizen 1973; Smart 1980). While not the primary focus of this guide, social availability is considered here in light of its significant effects on other forms of alcohol availability. The relationship between social drinking norms and regulatory controls is a critical subject in need of further research.

Other terms used in this guide's discussion of retail availability are explained below; a comprehensive glossary appears in appendix F.

Alcohol Outlet - A retail business that sells alcoholic beverages to the public or to a select membership. Under the 21st Amendment, each State has the power to control the means by which alcohol is made available to the public. Thus, States either establish a monopoly on retail sales of alcohol (see Control State) or issue various types of retail licenses to private parties to sell alcoholic beverages (see License State). These variations in States' regulations and the resulting variety of retail alcohol licenses largely account for the differing availabilities of alcohol products across the United States.

Alcohol Outlet Density - The number of outlets licensed to sell alcohol within a specific geographic area. To understand and compare the problems associated with alcohol availability within and among States, the following measures have been proposed to categorize outlets according to density (Wittman 1994):

Commercial Density - The percentage of alcohol outlets in relation to the total number of commercial outlets in a given planning area. For example, if a neighborhood has 16 stores and 4 of them sell alcohol, the commercial density for alcohol sales is 25 percent. Commercial density can also be measured by the relative share of floor space assigned to on- or off-sale alcohol sales. For example, in a convenience store with 1,000 square feet accessible to the customer, if 320 square feet were devoted to alcoholic beverages, then 30 percent of the store would be devoted to alcohol sales.

Geographic Density - The number of alcohol outlets per unit of land area within a given geographic area, such as a planning district, police reporting district, ZIP Code, or census tract. Geographic density reflects travel time and other costs incurred to obtain alcoholic beverages.

On-Sale Capacity - The aggregate number of spaces for alcoholic beverages in on-sale outlets within a determined geographic area.

Population Density - The density of alcohol outlets per population unit, or the number of outlets for a given population (see figure 2-1 in chapter 2). Population density figures are calculated for a defined geographic area.

Determining the density of alcohol outlets (typically per 1,000 residents) provides community members, city and local officials, and public policymakers with information that can support the development of effective public health intervention strategies. For example, an analysis of the number of licenses issued in a community at high risk for alcohol-related problems might prevent the issuance of additional licenses that would increase the threats to public health and safety.

Alcoholic Beverage Control Agency - The State agency responsible for regulating the manufacture, transportation, distribution, and sale of alcoholic beverages, as required by the 21st Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (the Prohibition Repeal Amendment).

Conditional-Use Permit (CUP) - An alcohol-sale permit granted to retail outlets on a case-by-case basis according to the merits of the permit application. The local review process may impose requirements designed to protect the community's health, safety, and welfare as a condition of the local zoning authority's approving the permit. The use of CUPs offers communities a significant opportunity to apply local land-use and planning ordinances to prevent health and safety problems associated with alcohol availability. CUPs can also be used as a means to eliminate public nuisances related to alcohol outlets.

Control State - A State that operates retail alcohol outlets for the sale of at least one of the three basic beverage types (wine, beer, and distilled spirits). These outlets, sometimes called "State stores," typically sell spirits and wine or spirits only, with private retailers permitted to sell beer. Control States historically have maintained tighter controls than others on the distribution and operation of alcohol outlets, but recent efforts by some control States to privatize retail sales are gradually blurring the distinctions from license States (see chapter 3).

License State - A State that issues licenses to retailers for the sale of alcoholic beverages.

Local Control - The powers of cities and counties to establish local public policies to regulate alcohol outlets. Several States give local jurisdictions the right of first review of any applications for State licenses. Most States reserve this right but give local jurisdictions the power to shape the local distribution and operation of alcohol outlets through planning and zoning permits. The latter method allows jurisdictions the flexibility to tailor policies to local conditions. The city or county might choose passive zoning, which issues permits automatically ("as of right") if the applicant meets minimum published standards, or it might use more active zoning to review each case on its merits through conditional-use permit reviews (see Conditional-Use Permit; active and passive zoning are discussed in detail in chapter 2).

Nexus - The relationship between an alcohol outlet and consequent alcohol-related problems. The term nexus is used both by ABC's considering the case of an individual outlet and to refer to classes of problems related to groups of alcohol outlets, such as community concerns about convenience stores' laxity regarding alcohol sales to minors.

Off-Sale Outlet - An establishment licensed to sell alcohol for consumption outside, but not within, its premises. Examples of off-sale outlets include liquor stores, supermarkets, specialty wine shops, and some gas stations and minimarkets (see Table 1-1).

On-Sale Outlet - An establishment licensed to sell alcohol for consumption within, but not outside, its premises. Examples of on-sale outlets include bars, taverns, clubs, and restaurants where alcohol is served. These outlets may sell alcoholic beverages only or they may provide snacks, other food items, and sometimes entertainment. State ABC's and local jurisdictions often distinguish between bars, which are primarily drinking establishments, and restaurants, where alcoholic beverage sales are incidental to the serving of meals (see Table 1-1).

In a small number of States, variations in on- and off-sale licensing result in combined forms of alcohol sales. For example, some on-sale alcohol outlets, such as bars, are licensed to sell packaged alcoholic beverages such as six-packs of beer for consumption off the premises. (See chapter 2 for a more detailed description of on- and off-sale outlets.)

Responsible Beverage Service - A general term describing a range of preventive policies and practices for the sale or service of alcoholic beverages in off- and on-sale establishments. These policies, mandatory in some States, are designed to prevent patrons from becoming intoxicated, to ensure that those who are intoxicated are not served and are not exposed to harm, and to prevent the sale of alcohol to minors.

Table 1-1. Types of Alcohol Outlets and Conditions of Sale

Types of Off-Sale Outlets

Types of On-Sale Outlets

Beer-only stores
Wine-only stores
Beer and wine stores
Beer, wine, and distilled spirits stores
State-owned stores
Local corner ("Mom & Pop") stores
Winery outlets
Supermarket stores
Gas stations/minimarkets
Delivery order services
Wine clubs
Cross-border shopping
Duty-free purchases
Illegal sales (e.g., home production, bootlegging, after-hour sales, distilling and winemaking operations)

Licensed restaurants:
Dining rooms
Fast-food establishments
Alternative venues:
Music halls
Nightclubs
Theaters
Art galleries
Sports arenas
Bars:
Within clubs (e.g., golf, bowling, Bingo)
Hair salons
Airport
lounges
Hotel minibars
Vending machines

Effects of Availability on Alcohol Problems

A significant body of research points to a strong association, or nexus, among alcohol availability, rates of consumption, and drinking-related problems (Bruun et al. 1975; Edwards et al. 1994). These relationships are most apparent where a sudden, sharp decrease in alcohol availability occurs. In several European countries, for example, strikes by liquor store workers eliminated nearly all legal alcohol sales. As a result, most individuals drank less (although some turned to illegally sold alcohol products). In some of these countries, the decrease in alcohol consumption was accompanied by a decline in alcohol-related problems such as traffic crashes, arrests for drunkenness, and admissions to detoxification centers (Edwards et al. 1994).

Recent research (Holder 1993a, b) has focused on several public health and safety problems related to alcohol availability, including general public consumption, crime and safety issues, traffic crashes, and youth access to alcohol, such as sales to underage drinkers.

The following sections briefly examine each of these research areas. A more detailed analysis of studies on specific interventions aimed at reducing alcohol availability problems appears in chapter 3.

natural experiment - a change in a situation, policy, or process typically not initiated by researchers but which can be evaluated by them.

Alcohol Availability and General Public Consumption

Studies of natural experiments clarify the relationships among alcohol availability, consumption, and related problems by analyzing the effects of market-driven or other naturally occurring changes in alcohol availability. Such studies have examined strikes by liquor store workers, prohibitions on alcohol sales, and shifts from monopoly to private alcohol sales and vice versa. Despite considerable variations in the ways these natural experiments took place, in general they indicate that a reduction in alcohol availability appears to reduce the rates of consumption and drinking-related problems such as public drunkenness, assaults, and drunk driving, at least immediately following the change in availability (Edwards et al. 1994).

Alcohol Availability and Crime and Safety Issues

Alcohol consumption is a factor in more than half of all homicides and serious assaults (Pernanen 1991). Among the respondents to Pernanen's study who had visited a public site where drinking took place at least twice in the previous 30 days, alcohol-related violence was more likely to be reported at on-sale outlets than in homes, work sites, schools, or the streets. Pernanen points out, however, that the relationship between alcohol and violence is complex and influenced by a variety of cultural, historical, personal, and other situational factors that in combination with the arousing effects of alcohol can turn into aggressive behaviors that lead to sexual and other types of assault.

Studies suggest a strong association between violence and the retail availability of alcohol (Cook and Moore 1993a, b; Fagan 1993a, b; Lester 1993; Parker and Rebhun 1995). As a result, public health officials and legislators as well as researchers are furthering their efforts to understand this relationship. For example, the higher rates of violence at bars have inspired studies of management practices and policies for serving alcohol, leading researchers to look at placing greater responsibility for any resulting problems on the managers of on-sale alcohol outlets (Holder and Wagenaar 1994).

Alcohol Availability and Traffic Crashes

Various links between alcohol availability and traffic crashes have been examined (Gruenewald et al. 1996; Holder 1993a; O'Malley and Wagenaar 1991; Scribner, Mackinnon, and Dwyer 1994; Van Oers and Garretsen 1993), including the relationships between alcohol-related crashes and minimum legal drinking age; density of licensed alcohol outlets; and place of last drink and the resulting incidence of driving while intoxicated (DWI) arrests.

A number of studies have found an inverse relationship between raising the minimum legal drinking age and the number of traffic crashes resulting in personal injury or death (O'Malley and Wagenaar 1991; Wagenaar and Wolfson 1994). The rate of crashes was shown to decline when the minimum age for legally purchasing alcohol was raised from 18 to 20 or 21 years.

As might be expected, researchers have identified a direct relationship between the density of alcohol outlets and the number of traffic crashes in a given area (Scribner, Mackinnon, and Dwyer 1995; Van Oers and Garretsen 1993). Research also has shown that the highest percentage of individuals charged with DWI consumed their last drink in a bar or restaurant; a study by Fell (1988), discussed in McKnight (1991), for example, reported that 30 percent of drivers arrested for DWI in Maryland were en route from bars or restaurants. Furthermore, data collected in roadside surveys indicated that a major share of the drinking by intoxicated drivers occurred in bars and restaurants (Interministerial Committee on Drinking-Driving 1980; McKnight 1991; Palmer 1986; Wolfe 1975). Overall, the proportion of DWI arrests after drinking at bars and restaurants to arrests after drinking at residences is greater than might be expected, even taking into consideration the relative proportions of alcohol sold through on- and off-sale outlets.

Alcohol Availability and Youth Access to Alcohol

In July 1984, Federal legislation resulted in all 50 States and the District of Columbia setting a minimum legal drinking age of 21 years. Despite retailers' awareness of these laws, research reveals that persons under 21 are frequently and even routinely able to purchase alcohol (Forster et al. 1994; Preusser and Williams 1992; Wagenaar and Wolfson 1994). In fact, of a U.S. population of more than 18 million 16- to 20-year-olds, most report drinking alcohol (University of Michigan Institute for Social Research 1998).

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2011 Hermosa Beach City Council Candidate Debate Questions

Candidates Opening Statement - Two minutes each  
 

Each candidate has one minute to respond to each of the Questions 1 thru 9.

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The first block of debate questions will be based the following document:

Hermosa Beach City Council GOALS AND WORK PLAN FOR 2011-12.

http://hermosabeach.granicus.com/MetaViewer.php?view_id=4&clip_id=1481&meta_id=92782

 

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Debate Question 1:

 

From the City Council’s Goals and Work Plan 2011-2012:

 

What are your top two priorities that would 

most benefit our local Hermosa Beach businesses?


 1 minute each to respond.

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Debate Question 2:

 

From the City Council’s Goals and Work Plan 2011-2012:

 

What are your top two priorities that would 

most benefit our Hermosa Beach residential neighborhoods?


 1 minute each to respond.

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Debate Question 3:

 

What are your top priorities that you would want 

to add to the City Council's Goals and Work Plan 2011-2012?


 1 minute to respond.

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What is your position on Ballot Measure Q and Ballot Measure N.


Each candidate will have 2 minutes to respond. 

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The second block of debate questions will be based the following report:

“Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County

- A Cities and Communities Report.”

Published by: The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health in March 2011

http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/epi/docs/AOD%20final%20print%20secured.pdf

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One of the quotes from the: 

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County” report stated:

"Communities with a high density of either On- or Off-Premises outlets were

. . 9 to 10 times more likely to have increased rates of violent crime"

Data compiled from the: 

Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County” report showed that:

- Hermosa Beach had 4 times the On-Premises alcohol outlet density 

compared to all of Los Angeles County. 


- Among the 7 South Bay cities bordering the ocean, 

from El Segundo south to Rancho Palos Verdes, 

Hermosa Beach ranked number 1 in the per capita rate of violent crime.  

 

- Hermosa Beach had more than double the rate of violent crime 

compared to Manhattan Beach.  

 

- Hermosa Beach had more than 3 times the rate of violent crime 

compared to Rancho Palos Verdes

 

- Hermosa Beach had more than 10 times the rate of violent crime 

compared to Palos Verdes Estates.    

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Debate Question 4:

 

Do you believe the findings in the 

"Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report 

regarding the relationship of alcohol outlet density 

to increased violent crime in a city?

 

 1 minute to respond.

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Debate Question 5:

 

Hermosa Beach and Manhattan Beach were both listed 

as having a “High Level” of alcohol outlet density.  

Data from the report showed that Hermosa Beach had more than

double the rate of violent crime compared to Manhattan Beach.   

 

In the past the HBPD has stated that over-crowding, over-serving 

and under-age drinking were problems that had to be dealt with.

 

Does over-crowding, over-serving and under-age drinking 

continue to be problem in Hermosa Beach? 

 1 minute to respond.
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Questions from the Audience

 

 1 minute to respond.

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Debate Question 6:

 

One of the recommendations from the "Reducing Alcohol-Related Harms in Los Angeles County" report was to:

"Ensure compliance with responsible sales and serving practices."

 

Would strict enforcement of the 50-50 law with verified documentation; 

reduce the alcohol related problems that the HBPD has to deal, 

from restaurants that over-serve alcohol?

 

 1 minute to respond.

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The next block of debate questions relate 

to future policy options for Hermosa Beach.

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Debate Question 7:

 

From the report the 7 South Bay city ranking showed that city’s with 

a High alcohol outlet density had a higher rate of violent crime.  

While cities listed with a Low alcohol outlet density had a lower rate of violent crime. 

 

Currently new beer and wine restaurants that close by 10pm can open up 

in Hermosa Beach without going thru the CUP process, which includes public hearings. 

 

This same by “by right” process can also add new liquor stores.

 

Is there a net economic benefit to Hermosa Beach, when new beer and wine 

restaurants or new liquor stores are allowed to open without public hearings?

 

 1 minute to respond.

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Question 8:

  

Under current zoning, businesses such as nightclub cabarets, 

pornography stores, massage parlors or tattoo shops are allowed 

to open in designated Hermosa Beach commercial zones.

 

Does the addition of new adult-oriented businesses 

near residential neighborhoods and schools, benefit the city?

 

Is there a net economic benefit to the city from adding 

more adult-oriented businesses in Hermosa Beach?

 

 1 minute to respond.

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Question 9:  

 

The Public Safety budget, which includes the HBPD and the HBFD, 

makes up about 65% of the city's yearly budget.

The HBPD is operating with 5-6 less police officers positions due to budget cuts. 

The HBFD also recently lost 3 firefighter positions due to budget cuts. 

 

What are your top priorities for the future of 

public safety operations in the Hermosa Beach?


 1 minute to respond.

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If time allows we will have:

 

Questions from the Audience


 1 minute to respond.

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Hermosa Beach City Council Candidates Closing Statements:

 2 minutes to respond.

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End of Hermosa Beach City Council Debate

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